Jump to content

Recommended Posts

As I have realized that medicines/drugs actually can help reducing blushing at a significant level, I decided to read up on it as much as possible. I have therefore gained some knowledge that I believe some will find valuable. For people only suffering with blushing at certain situations, like presentations, taking Propranolol (a beta blocker) and/or Benzodiazepines an hour before is often the solution. This is not what this thread will be about. My goal is to find the best medicines that you can take in the morning, and that last for a whole day (I will post information about different medicines in this thread, but for people interested in my own personal experience I have posted my information here: http://esfbchannel.invisionzone.com/index.php?/topic/4079-kprf-red-cheeks-questions-and-my-facial-blushing-story/).

I have found that there are 3 different types of medicines you can take every day, that will reduce blushing. I will also get into natural supplements that can be helpful. You can choose to just use one og the medicines, but a combination of several might be a better option. This is because if you just use 1 medicine you might have to use a high dose to get an acceptable effect, but then the chances of getting many side effects also increase. Whereas when you take several you often do not have to take high doses.  The medicines also affect the body in different ways, so different medicines may work best for different situations, and therefore a combination of several might be the best fit.

When choosing a medicine make sure to pick the slow/extended release version, when available, so that it will last for a day.  

The side effects from the medicines are actually very similar in all medicines. Common side effects are fatigue, sexual dysfunction, etc. But every person respond somewhat differently, so you have to try for yourself. And of course the higher dose you take, and the more medicines you combine, the greater are the risks for side effects.

 

Beta-blockers

The main usage of this medicine is for people with heart problems. They work by blocking the effect of Norepinephrine, which is involved in the ”fight and flight”-mechanism.

It is particularly helpful in typical “high pressured situations", like when giving a presentation. 

Atenolol: This is the beta blocker you should pick. It is known to last longer than propranolol, and with fewer side effects. Lowest dose is 25 mg/day, but you can increase up to 100/mg without a problem if needed (maybe even more).  If you don´t respond to atenolol, there is a slow release version of propranolol available.

You usually will be able to see the full effect from this medicine the same day you take it, but at least within two weeks.

 

Antidepressants

As the name indicates this is a medicines used for depression, but it is also used for panic attacks, social anxiety and general anxiety. It works by increasing the level of serotonin in the brain, and it is known to help with both blushing AND flushing.  It works particularly well in “everyday blushing” when talking to people.

There are so many different antidepressants available. I will list some of the once I have read to be most beneficial in curing blushing:

SSRI (Top 4 – starting with the best):

      1.    Zoloft (Sertraline)

      2.    Paxil (Paroxetine)

      3.    Lexapro (Escitalopram) 

      4. Celexa (Citalopram)

SNRI

      1.    Efexor (Venlafaxine)

This is the only SNRI to consider.

Buspirone (In combination with SNRI or SSRI)

If you experience sexual side effects from these medicines, which is very common, one way of solving it is combining them with this drug. It is mostly prescribed for general anxiety, so the medicine by itself may also cure blushing.

 Mirtazapin

This is one of the few antidepressants not known to give severe sexual side effects. So, if you are worried about that, this might be one to try.

You should see the full effect from all antidepressants within 4-8 weeks.

 

 Pregabalin (Lyrica)

This is a medicine mostly used for epilepsy, neuropathic pain and general anxiety. It increases the GABA production in the brain, and calms down the nervous system. Most surgeons performing the ETS surgery think blushing comes from an overactive nervous system, so this might be the perfect drug for blushers?  

You should see full effect from this drug after 1 week.

 

Natural supplements:

5-HTP  - This is the natural version of an antidepressants, and works by increasing the level of serotonin. Normal daily dose is 100-300 mg/day, taken before bed and in the morning. A good dose to try is 100 mg in the morning and 100 mg before bedtime. If you do not get any effect from 5-HTP, you can try L-tryptophan. It is also a natural supplement working in the same way as 5-HTP. 500-1000 mg is a recommended daily dose. You should not take both 5-http and L-tryptophan.

L-theanine – This is the natural version of Prebagalin/Lyrica, and it increases the GABA-production in the body. 400 mg is a recommended daily dose. Also here you can take 200 mg in the morning and 200 mg before going to bed. Also note: There is a natural supplement called GABA. This is not known to cross the blood brain barrier, so there are no scientific evidence saying that the supplement called GABA will work. Still, there are people claiming it to work, so if L-theanine doesn´t work for you, you can always try this.

The natural supplements take 4-8 weeks before you can se the full effect from them. There are no severe side effects to get from them. So if you have not tried any medicines you really have nothing to loose trying out natural supplements, to see if they are of any help to you.

 

Combinations of drugs

As mentioned, a combination of several medicines, using low doses, might be the best option. Perhaps antidepressants and beta-blockers is the perfects fit? Or Lyrica and beta-blockers? Maybe a combination of the two natural supplements is enough for you? You have to try this out for yourself. Please post any success stories in the comment section below. Make sure not to mix medicines and supplements that should not be mixed, like 5-HTP and an antidepressant.

 

Note:

Taking medicines should not be done without consulting a trained physician.

ANY SUCCESS STORIES REGARDING USING MEDICINES/DRUGS IN CURING BLUSHING ARE HIGHLY APPRECIATED. PLEASE POST THEM IN THE COMMENT SECTION BELOW.

Edited by blushingman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Blushman,

So impressed by this great summary. I hope that it will be completed bit by bit !

It will be very helpful to all of us who want to explore the physiological way of curing to restore the body balance.

Your work, as the work of other members previously, should be saved in a kind of encyclopedia, to be easily accessible.

 

Concerning the content, and as far as i'm concerned, i didn't know the L-theanine, precursor of GABA. A quit research on the web seems to show It is cheap (In France <0,10 euros a day for 400mg). I thing i will try this to see how it works with serotonine/5 HT (griffonia, 80mg a day). I am also very curious with slow release version of beta blocker : it seems to be a very promising approach. I will keep on searching a natural source of that.

I must assumed that i consider more and more the psychological approach, not as a cure, but as a essential part of a whole. At least, meditation should be studied by every one, regardless of blushing : it opens new perspectives, as a world to explore !

 

best regards

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An other medicine to consider: Clonidine

I have just read a lot about this medicine (There are also many users from this forum, who talked about it back in 2007-2009). Here is what I gathered: 

- It is a heart medicine similar to beta blockers, but not quite the same.

- It works best for flushing, and somewhat for blushing.

- People who struggled with both blushing and flushing used a combo with a low dose of both clonidine and a beta blocker, with good results. 

- It should be taken twice a day, or as needed before flushing events.

- Common side effects are dry mouth and fatigue.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agreed, I used it when I used to suffer from severe flushing and found it quite effective. I'm not sure what effect it had on my blushing because I was already on effexor for that which is effective for me.

In terms of side effects, I can't say I experienced any which is strange as I had heard the side effects can be strong enough. but as I always say, everyone reacts differently. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Everyone,

Blushingman - thank you for your persistence and scientific-like approach. It's really impressive and I appreciate you sharing.

I'm 27 and have suffered with these issues probably since early teens. Some level of redness on the entire cheek area constantly but the variation is the real killer. At times it's not bad at all but the daily flushing/blushing is intense. I have all the usual triggers as well as seemingly random flushing (e.g. in the evening) and blushing. I also have some redness on my nose, eyebrow area, chin, and neck. But the cheek area is where the flushing etc. takes place. I think I have Keratosis Pilarsis Rubra Faceii (I can see tiny bumps on the cheek), but dermatologists are unwilling to diagnose it precisely. 

I have a daily skin care regime which is helpful (I'll post about details somewhere else maybe). I also take low-dose Doxycycline/ i.e. Oracea daily for its anti-inflammatory properties - my derm. believes this should help but I can't be sure if it does. I'm currently doing a KTP/vbeam 'campaign'. I'm not sure how helpful this will be but I'm seeing one of the best laser dermatologists in the world and want to see what improvements it can offer. I've done 2 treatments so far and will likely go for 5 or so total. As soon as that's done I'm going to try some medication. Maybe Effexor to begin with since it can help flushing and blushing. Overall people seem to have had positive experiences with that. The major issue does seem to be with the sympathetic nervous system, or whatever triggers flushing - since at times I'm barely red. So medication seems like a key component to managing this.

Anyway, I just wanted to introduce myself on this thread and say that I'm looking forward to joining in with the experiments. I've always felt that an effective strategy for managing this is out there with the right combination of treatments etc. Please keep posting and I'll do the same in a few months.

Thanks

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for that comment, blushnyc :) 

From your description, unless you have Rosacea (a good dermatologist will be able to see this), you most certainly have KPRF. Your issues are completely similar to mine (The variation being the absolute worst killer, having flushing in the evening, etc.). 

I have had over 10 laser treatments now, with some of the best dermatologist in my country, using both Vbeam and Cutera Excel V. It did help perhaps 15-25 %, but it really was disappointing how little it actually reduced the symptoms. Also, the dermatologists said you have to come back yearly for follow up treatments, as the result is not permanent (Since this is in our genes, and the skin cells die and new once are produces over time). 

Anyway, thank you for sharing and good luck in your further investigation! Looking forward to reading your updates. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More on beta-blockers:

It turns out Atenolol doesn't work for the entire day (tried this out myself). Its half-life is 6-9 hours, so you will need to take this twice a day.

Propranolol has an even shorter half-life, so if you want the effect from this throughout the day, you will need to take it 3-4 times/day.

There is however other beta-blockers, not often used for anxiety symptoms like blushing, but which lasts for an entire day, so you might want to give it a try. The most common beta-blocker like this is probably Nadolol (Corgard). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for that comment, blushnyc :) 

From your description, unless you have Rosacea (a good dermatologist will be able to see this), you most certainly have KPRF. Your issues are completely similar to mine (The variation being the absolute worst killer, having flushing in the evening, etc.). 

I have had over 10 laser treatments now, with some of the best dermatologist in my country, using both Vbeam and Cutera Excel V. It did help perhaps 15-25 %, but it really was disappointing how little it actually reduced the symptoms. Also, the dermatologists said you have to come back yearly for follow up treatments, as the result is not permanent (Since this is in our genes, and the skin cells die and new once are produces over time). 

Anyway, thank you for sharing and good luck in your further investigation! Looking forward to reading your updates. 

Hi Blushingman! I¨m new to this forum and have written my experience with KPRF on your other thread. I have seen that you are quite active on this forum and thats really great. I¨m 24 years old and have been to a few doctors with this problem and most of them told me I have Rosacea, but after I looked into KPRF I am almost sure that I have that instead of Rosacea, I will post pictures in this post. I have taken all together 6 laser treatments I believe, with different types of lasers. I honestly don¨t know if it has helped at all with reducing the redness, but I still flush easily on a daily basis. I wanted to ask you if you have tried or are considering trying the ETS surgery? I approached a surgeon a few years ago, asking if the surgery would help me, when its mainly for people with Rosacea. He told me then that the surgery would actually make my red cheeks worse and not be helpful at all. I have tried a few anti-redness creams with minimal effect, but I have not tried medicines for this and I might look into it over time. I do actually use a green concealer from Eva Garden, which I use daily. It helps cause green colour covers over the red colour, but if I use to much of it you can clearly see that I have it on me, so i always just use a short amount. Not the most flattering pic, but it will do. As you can see, this is a mild case and I¨m just at home now so not stressed out or not triggered by any temperatures. You can see that I have normal colour in some places, and maybe thats because of the laser treatment. I honestly don¨t know. I never had that before, cause I were always all red on the cheeks. 

 

IMG_0994.jpg

Edited by KeepGoing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Blushingman! I¨m new to this forum and have written my experience with KPRF on your other thread. I have seen that you are quite active on this forum and thats really great. I¨m 24 years old and have been to a few doctors with this problem and most of them told me I have Rosacea, but after I looked into KPRF I am almost sure that I have that instead of Rosacea, I will post pictures in this post. I have taken all together 6 laser treatments I believe, with different types of lasers. I honestly don¨t know if it has helped at all with reducing the redness, but I still flush easily on a daily basis. I wanted to ask you if you have tried or are considering trying the ETS surgery? I approached a surgeon a few years ago, asking if the surgery would help me, when its mainly for people with Rosacea. He told me then that the surgery would actually make my red cheeks worse and not be helpful at all. I have tried a few anti-redness creams with minimal effect, but I have not tried medicines for this and I might look into it over time. I do actually use a green concealer from Eva Garden, which I use daily. It helps cause green colour covers over the red colour, but if I use to much of it you can clearly see that I have it on me, so i always just use a short amount. Not the most flattering pic, but it will do. As you can see, this is a mild case and I¨m just at home now so not stressed out or not triggered by any temperatures. You can see that I have normal colour in some places, and maybe thats because of the laser treatment. I honestly don¨t know. I never had that before, cause I were always all red on the cheeks. 

 

IMG_0994.jpg

I can¨t post another pic of the other cheek, but its just the same so oh well. 

 

Edited by KeepGoing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi KeepGoing,

I am afraid I'm not able to view the pictures you have added. You can take a look at this link, to see the difference in KPRF and Rosacea: http://s1135.photobucket.com/user/moore778899/media/Screenshot2011-01-29at131453.png.html. KPRF is just a redness of the cheeks, while with Rosacea you can get thicker skin, bumps, enlarged nose, pus-filled pimples and inflammation. That is why certain medications like antibiotics are helpful for Rosacea (to reduce the inflammation of the skin) but not for the permanent redness KPRF sufferers have. 

I have not had the ETS-surgery done. I am actually soon going to make an other update in the other thread I have started where I will cover thoughts on the surgery as well. The surgery will not do anything about the permanent redness, whether you have Rosacea or KPRF. It helps with blushing only. I have read about people getting flushing reduced as well, like when they worked out. I have also read about people getting a more intense and constant flushing of the face (due to the fact that you do not longer sweat from the head and cool your face, so your head remains hot in warm environments, which can cause flushing as well). In summations: Do not have the surgery done for flushing, but you can consider it if blushing is your main problem.  

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well this topic must go up because it summarizes few remedies.
Im currently using a tea {balsanor basan :S) tea is called} its a tea that calms you down similar to chamomile but something different that helps with the anxiety i can say try it or a different kind of tea drinking it before going out.. it wont do miracles but somedays it keeps you very calm and maybe some kind of tea can do you a bit of a change. It is a option that should be considered

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Long lasting Beta Blockers 

I have gathered new knowledge on beta blockers after speaking to a doctor about it. The reason why the two beta blockers Propranolol and Atenolol almost exclusively are mentioned for stopping blushing is not because they are better than other beta blockers. Actually, all beta blockers are very similar, and one of the main distinction is their half-life (Time it takes for a drug/medicine to reach half of its effect). The reason why Propranolol and Atenolol is commonly used is ironically because they have a short half-life. Since many people experience physical symptoms like shaking, blushing, trembling of the voice, etc. at specific events (Like when giving a presentation) they only need it for that specific event. Then they can go the rest of the day without the effect (Including without side effects – hence the short half-life being preferable). For chronic blushers however, that makes Propranolol and Atenolol a bad choice. Since we have this every day, we also need the medicine to work for the entire day.

Below is a list of beta blockers with longer half-life, but first let me give some information about them. As we know, chronic blushing is caused by too much activation of the sympathetic nervous system. This is why the ETS-surgery can be successful, since you destroy the nerves involved in this process. But instead of destroying the nervous system (And by that also destroying positive effects the nervous system has, like regulating heat), you can block the hormones/neurotransmitters that causes the over-activation. When the blushing happens, it is adrenaline and noradrenaline working on the nervous system. But before this happens, the hormones/neuro transmitters need to react with adrenergic receptors. A beta blocker works by blocking these receptors, thereby blocking the nervous system to be over-activated, which result in reduced or no blushing.

Even though all beta blockers are very similar, there are some main differences.

       1. generation beta blockers. Non selective: Meaning they block both beta-1 and beta-2 receptors.

       2. generation beta blockers. Selective: Meaning they only block beta-1 receptors.

       3. generation beta blockers. They can be both selective and non-selective. What is more, they also cause vasodilation. The non-selective because they also work as an alpha-blocker, and the selective by releasing Nitric Oxide or by blocking calcium channels. Since the 3. generation beta blockers cause the blood vessels to dilate, they may not be good for chronic blushers. However, I have not tried these, so I can not say if it will be an issue (But if you experience extra increased redness, you know why).

Adrenaline and noradrenaline can react with both the receptors, making 1. generations a better choice. However, it is more common that they react with beta-1 receptors, so that the other generation beta blockers can work fine as well. Propranolol is a 1. generation beta blocker and Atenolol a 2. generation beta blocker, and both have worked fine for stopping blushing for me. Less side effects is defiantly preferable, so that’s why 2. generation beta blocker may be the best choice. We are all somewhat biologically different, so you may have to try out a few different options, to see what works best for you (In finding what works best + has the least side effects).

Note: Even 2. generation beta blockers block the beta-2 receptor, if the concentration is high enough. But of course, the higher dosage once uses, the greater the side effects. Therefore, if you notice you need blockage of the beta 2. receptor, a lower dose of a 1. generation beta blocker might be preferable.

There are also other differences, like some beta blockers being excreted through the kidneys, others being metabolized by the liver. I am not sure how this can affect the body differently, but it may create some effects and side effects that differs from person to person.

Also note that beta blocker can have a positive effect in reducing flushing to some degree.  

 

List of beta blockers with long half-life (Note that some of the beta blockers may not be available in the country you live in):

Betaxolol

o   Half-life: 14-22 hours

o   Type: 3. generation. Selective (Blocks calcium channels).

 

Nadolol

o   Half-life: 14-24 hours

o   Type: 1. generation

 

Sotalol

o   Half-life: 12 hours

o   Type: 1. generation

 

Nebivolol

o   Half-life: 10-12 hours

o   Type: 3. generation. Selective (NO release).

 

Bisoprolol

o    Half-life: 10-12 hours

o   Type: 2. generation

 

In terms of dosage, it depends on factors like weight, age, etc. Personally, I needed 100 mg of Atenolol or Propranolol for it to work for blushing, so I will need to find a dosage corresponding to that for one of the beta blockers in the list above. You have to see for yourself if you want to take an extra large dose in the morning (and having it last for the entire day), or taking a smaller dose twice a day. Anyway, the absolute maximum amount will be twice a day with all these beta blockers, and that is pretty easy to make in to a habit.

If anyone has a positive experience, please make an update of it! Also, if you are a medical professional with knowledge of beta blockers, which beta blockers should in theory be the best? Chronic blushers really only need the effect a beta blocker has on calming the sympathetic nervous system (+the reduced heart rate may be a good thing as well). I expect all will work somewhat, but if anyone knows which creates the least side effects (like fatigue can be really bothersome) please make a comment about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎22‎.‎02‎.‎2017 at 11:07 PM, Mrhot said:

Reading good reviews on Nardil anti depressant which is old i think this is my next med to try

How did Nardil go? Did you take any other meds?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 16/09/2017 at 2:37 PM, blushingman said:

Long lasting Beta Blockers 

I have gathered new knowledge on beta blockers after speaking to a doctor about it. The reason why the two beta blockers Propranolol and Atenolol almost exclusively are mentioned for stopping blushing is not because they are better than other beta blockers. Actually, all beta blockers are very similar, and one of the main distinction is their half-life (Time it takes for a drug/medicine to reach half of its effect). The reason why Propranolol and Atenolol is commonly used is ironically because they have a short half-life. Since many people experience physical symptoms like shaking, blushing, trembling of the voice, etc. at specific events (Like when giving a presentation) they only need it for that specific event. Then they can go the rest of the day without the effect (Including without side effects – hence the short half-life being preferable). For chronic blushers however, that makes Propranolol and Atenolol a bad choice. Since we have this every day, we also need the medicine to work for the entire day.

Below is a list of beta blockers with longer half-life, but first let me give some information about them. As we know, chronic blushing is caused by too much activation of the sympathetic nervous system. This is why the ETS-surgery can be successful, since you destroy the nerves involved in this process. But instead of destroying the nervous system (And by that also destroying positive effects the nervous system has, like regulating heat), you can block the hormones/neurotransmitters that causes the over-activation. When the blushing happens, it is adrenaline and noradrenaline working on the nervous system. But before this happens, the hormones/neuro transmitters need to react with adrenergic receptors. A beta blocker works by blocking these receptors, thereby blocking the nervous system to be over-activated, which result in reduced or no blushing.

Even though all beta blockers are very similar, there are some main differences.

       1. generation beta blockers. Non selective: Meaning they block both beta-1 and beta-2 receptors.

       2. generation beta blockers. Selective: Meaning they only block beta-1 receptors.

       3. generation beta blockers. They can be both selective and non-selective. What is more, they also cause vasodilation. The non-selective because they also work as an alpha-blocker, and the selective by releasing Nitric Oxide or by blocking calcium channels. Since the 3. generation beta blockers cause the blood vessels to dilate, they may not be good for chronic blushers. However, I have not tried these, so I can not say if it will be an issue (But if you experience extra increased redness, you know why).

Adrenaline and noradrenaline can react with both the receptors, making 1. generations a better choice. However, it is more common that they react with beta-1 receptors, so that the other generation beta blockers can work fine as well. Propranolol is a 1. generation beta blocker and Atenolol a 2. generation beta blocker, and both have worked fine for stopping blushing for me. Less side effects is defiantly preferable, so that’s why 2. generation beta blocker may be the best choice. We are all somewhat biologically different, so you may have to try out a few different options, to see what works best for you (In finding what works best + has the least side effects).

Note: Even 2. generation beta blockers block the beta-2 receptor, if the concentration is high enough. But of course, the higher dosage once uses, the greater the side effects. Therefore, if you notice you need blockage of the beta 2. receptor, a lower dose of a 1. generation beta blocker might be preferable.

There are also other differences, like some beta blockers being excreted through the kidneys, others being metabolized by the liver. I am not sure how this can affect the body differently, but it may create some effects and side effects that differs from person to person.

Also note that beta blocker can have a positive effect in reducing flushing to some degree.  

 

List of beta blockers with long half-life (Note that some of the beta blockers may not be available in the country you live in):

Betaxolol

o   Half-life: 14-22 hours

o   Type: 3. generation. Selective (Blocks calcium channels).

 

Nadolol

o   Half-life: 14-24 hours

o   Type: 1. generation

 

Sotalol

o   Half-life: 12 hours

o   Type: 1. generation

 

Nebivolol

o   Half-life: 10-12 hours

o   Type: 3. generation. Selective (NO release).

 

Bisoprolol

o    Half-life: 10-12 hours

o   Type: 2. generation

 

In terms of dosage, it depends on factors like weight, age, etc. Personally, I needed 100 mg of Atenolol or Propranolol for it to work for blushing, so I will need to find a dosage corresponding to that for one of the beta blockers in the list above. You have to see for yourself if you want to take an extra large dose in the morning (and having it last for the entire day), or taking a smaller dose twice a day. Anyway, the absolute maximum amount will be twice a day with all these beta blockers, and that is pretty easy to make in to a habit.

If anyone has a positive experience, please make an update of it! Also, if you are a medical professional with knowledge of beta blockers, which beta blockers should in theory be the best? Chronic blushers really only need the effect a beta blocker has on calming the sympathetic nervous system (+the reduced heart rate may be a good thing as well). I expect all will work somewhat, but if anyone knows which creates the least side effects (like fatigue can be really bothersome) please make a comment about it.

I'm very interested in what you are taking now I'm on clonidine and propranolol. I'm not even sure if the propranolol working once I started taking clonidine I think it reduced the redness a little 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 22.9.2017 at 7:27 PM, redattack said:

I'm very interested in what you are taking now I'm on clonidine and propranolol. I'm not even sure if the propranolol working once I started taking clonidine I think it reduced the redness a little 

Hi again, redattack. 

This you asked about here not long ago: http://esfbchannel.invisionzone.com/topic/4079-kprf-red-cheeks-questions-and-my-facial-blushing-story/?page=5 

 

Like I said, am not using any one regularly, but for the moment I am trying out different options of the long lasting beta blockers. If you wish to do the same, I would find the three beta blockers with the longest half life being available in your country, and see which gives you the best effect. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the time you have taken to share so many resources, blushingman!!! After researching extensively, I stumbled across a few studies and articles that mentioned the use of botox to prevent facial flushing in rosacea patients.  The effects lasted for 4-6 months following single procedure.  Are you familiar at all with this? Do you know if facial flushing is the same between rosacea and kp rubra faceii patients? There is obviously more info out there for rosacea vs. kp rubra (which is what I'd like to treat).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello, @qbee, and welcome to the forum! :)
Thank you for those kind words. I have read a lot about these subjects over the years, so I am just glad to share and help if possible. 

I have heard of botox for flushing. However, I have not found many studies, nor people on forums, with a successful result from it. I did try it myself 1 time, without any change in flushing. Therefor, I can not recommend it. 

There is without a doubt differences between the flushing of KPRF and Rosacea. Rosacea is unfortunately often a lot worse, but there are specific medications for reducing it. Combined with lasers, a good diet/healthy lifestyle and SSRI/SNRI for flushing, the disease/condition can be greatly reduced. In the future I hope there is a real cure, so that Rosacea becomes a thing of the past, for all people who has it, and wanting not to have it any more. 

Wish you alle the best, and good luck! :)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...