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  • @Blushingman Thank you so much for your long and thoughtfull posts! Your thoughts on the matters helps me so much to cope with and better understand my own chronic blushing. Due to your argumentation I have come to realize that chronic blushing really is a physical condition and should be treated a such. Even though every person suffering from unpredictable and uncontrollable daily episodes of blushing probably probably will be suffering from psychological distress/damage as a consequence diminishing this distress will not get to the bottom of the problem. I've wasted money on therapy and hypnosis and Im kind of mad at my family, therapist and doctors for talking me into believing that I should be able to mentally cure my self from a physical problem. Its like telling someone with a paralyzed leg that it's his job to make it work again by talking about his emotions and bad experiences of it getting paralized. F'** that. 
  • Anyways.. All your talk about the scientific world finding a less damaging cure than EST really gives me hope. Im at the point myself where Im gonna see my new docter next week to ask her about long time active betablockers. Im also gonna see a surgoen the week after to hear about EST and to see if Im a candidate myself. So the thing is I really dont like the idea of taking pills. I know if these pills works for me I will get addicted to the feeling of freedom and I'm afraid of how its gonna affect me to be totally dependent on daily medicine to be the person I want to be. I'm more the type of person who would take the risk and go straight to the problem, and getting the nerves cut in surgery. However... If just cant help thinking that what if a new cure is found i a years time, and i choose the pills during that time, and could get a treatment without having to cope with a new serious problem. Compensatory sweating... 
  • Another thing is that I'm not sure im "troubled" enough for the surgery. I can go a few days without blushing If Im lucky by using cooping strategies like wearing make-up, always making sure to be underdressed so Im cold ( then i blush less), and trying to meet with friends outside as much as possible because for some reason I rarely blush when Im outside. But when Im eating dinner around a table, with lights and if it is hot I am sure to blush many times, and I always feel like sh** afterwards. Right now I live with my cousin and we almost always eat in front of the tv, so In that eat I can avoid this.  But in a few weeks I have to move into a more social house and Im dreading that I might have to move out as happened last time I lived in a social house. 
  • I dont know what to do.. I guess I kind of was wondering If you/ or anyone else has any thought on what I should do? I feel a bit alone with a very big decision to be honest.. Im 23, female and from Denmark btw :-) 

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Thank you for that, @Nina. It is always nice to hear that the posts can be of some help! :) 

Regarding your question of what you should do, that is something you will have to decide for yourself. I can only give you my view, research and other peoples experience of it. It is of course choosing between two terrible options, not even knowing if it will help. And knowing that it in some way will destroy your health, just hoping it will not be of a too great degree. Personally I find it tolerable using medication for a while, while the field of medicine progresses, and that we hopefully soon have better solutions available. But I also fully understand yours and others reasoning of not wanting to rely on medications, and therefor going for the ETS-surgery. Again, it is not fun having so few options. No one wants to rely on medication, no one wants to have the surgery done, but being forced to live in a body which is built for chronic blushing (and/or KPRF, Rosacea, etc.) is even worse (Like I have written before, I feel that a suitable metaphor is being a prisoner in your own body, that you are innocent for being in that position, but still - for now - there not being hope of getting out). I hope you find what is best for you. 

I will update if I find new information that can be of value, and I hope others do the same. I don't have anything new to add for the moment, on this matter, but to end with something positive; there are progress within the field of medicine in general (Which of course possibly can lead to cures of chronic blushing, KPRF, Rosacea, etc.): The FDA has approved a new gene therapy - treating a form of inherited vision loss: https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm589467.htm 

Wish you all the best! :)  

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Thank you for your reply @Blushingman it means a lot to me. I've been reading all your posts and in a wierd way I feel comfortable about trying out whichever treatment your on. So of course depending on what my doctor and surgeon has to say I might try out medicine as well for now. You wrote somewhere that both the medicine and the surgery has bad side effects, and I guess I would rather be generel fatigued by the beta blockers then having to deal with CS for now. Especially as you can get off medicine again. If the right medicine can diminish the blushing to a point where I can be my self in everyday life without constant fear of turning red, I will try this out first. It it dosn't work ETS_surgery it is. 

I really am hoping for gene therapy to be the solution ! Thank you so much for spreading hope ! I will keep my eyes out as well for any news on the matter. 

Btw do you think it would be possible for people in this forum to create some kind of organization, so we could raise the money to financially support the development of a treatment! Like If we could write some scientists or I dont know... I just feel like we need to create more attention to FB, KPRF, Rosacea and so on :-) 

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Yes. Curing all this is not a matter of "if", it is a matter of "when". As new technologies in medicine (stem cell, nano, gene, other) both become more advanced and common, it is only a matter of having people working on this for creating a solution. And that is of course a funding issue - paying for the research, development and execution. It is a great suggestion, setting up some sort of account or organization, raising money for curing this. It is something I have thought of myself. The reason why I haven't suggested it, is I don't want to suggest people to give away some of their money, if it is not for a serious project. If you just raise a lot of money, and then contact people saying you want to give them money for research, you are bound to run in to unethical or unreliable people, just looking to take advantage of the situation. Then you just end up giving money to someone not interested in creating a real solution, just looking to make some easy money. However, a serious organization, with a proven track record, looking for a new project, that could be something. And I am a bigger believer in investing, not just donating. Investing in either the project or the company itself. That is a win-win for both the investor and organization. The organization don't have to put up all of their own money for the research and development, and the investors get a profit if the work is successful (Since they have part-ownership in future sales). Of course, donating can work as well. Then it is important that the donation goes to an organization with a serious capability and intention of curing KPRF, chronic blushing, Rosacea or just abnormal facial redness in general, and that the money is earmarked for that purpose only. If I find an organization/project worthy of investing in, or donating to, I will let you know. I hope others do the same. 
Cheers :) 

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I had my ets surgary done this friday. Suffered from facial blushing/flushing for as long i can remember, it have been such a negative and the biggest impact on my life. Avoided and destroyed so many social situations  over the years, ended up with a bad anxeity as many other on this forum. I read many of you see the ets surgary as the last option and you would rather be medicated for the rest of your lifes, i looked at it the other way around. Cut the nerve and deal with the potentially cs and other side effects, instead of popping pills day in and day out (maybe not so smart). Anyways, seams like the ets didnt work on me... guess I have to start trying out som pills my self. :unsure:

My face feels and looks just as before the surgary, I think. I still have the moderate 24/7 flush i had before, and have blushed up in a few situations. Easy way to check the flushing, took a realy hot shower to trigger it, and was just as red I used to be, but it might have faded away a little bit faster than before. Feel like have to test the social blushing a bit more before i call it a total failure. Hopefully it is just some remaining pigments/nerves that will slowly go away, but i wouldt bet on it haha, i think im stuck in this. I feel like a fu***** idiot, but anyways life goes on i guess...   :)


 

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15 hours ago, killbill12 said:

I had my ets surgary done this friday. Suffered from facial blushing/flushing for as long i can remember, it have been such a negative and the biggest impact on my life. Avoided and destroyed so many social situations  over the years, ended up with a bad anxeity as many other on this forum. I read many of you see the ets surgary as the last option and you would rather be medicated for the rest of your lifes, i looked at it the other way around. Cut the nerve and deal with the potentially cs and other side effects, instead of popping pills day in and day out (maybe not so smart). Anyways, seams like the ets didnt work on me... guess I have to start trying out som pills my self. :unsure:

My face feels and looks just as before the surgary, I think. I still have the moderate 24/7 flush i had before, and have blushed up in a few situations. Easy way to check the flushing, took a realy hot shower to trigger it, and was just as red I used to be, but it might have faded away a little bit faster than before. Feel like have to test the social blushing a bit more before i call it a total failure. Hopefully it is just some remaining pigments/nerves that will slowly go away, but i wouldt bet on it haha, i think im stuck in this. I feel like a fu***** idiot, but anyways life goes on i guess...   :)



 

Hello killbill12 :) 

Thank you for sharing your story. First of all, do not feel like an idiot for having gone through with the ETS-surgery. Living in a body made for chronic blushing is hell, and of course anyone would want to get out. Unfortunately there only are terrible options available (for now). ETS seems like the only choice that can really work, but at the same time there are no guarantees, and you can get horrible side effects. On the top of that you can not know beforehand what the outcome will be, and then you are stuck with the outcome for the rest of your life. It is such a tough and devastating choice to have to make, and whether you chose for or against it, you deserve respect for making the decision. No one should have to make such a choice, and gamble with your health like that. It is such a pathetic thing that the medical community has no real solution for excessive facial redness, and that people are forced to make decisions like this. Hopefully that will change, before too long.  

Note that the surgery will do nothing for any permanent redness you may have (KPRF, Rosacea or other). It is also not intended for flushing, like when taking a hot shower. It will only be helpful (if you are one of the persons the surgery works on) for social blushing. 
Cheers, and keep fighting! :) 

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Quick question: Does sun tanning undo the effects of the vbeam? Also, do you have to redo the vbeam treatment after a while, like does it wear off eventually? Asking cause I had it done and am stoked to have pink cheeks now rather than cherry red like before.

Also, I want to say something to ya'll that I feel no one else is saying. I have kprf just as bad as the next guy. It's some bull**** lemme tell ya. Pisses me off when I think too hard about it. I feel envious everyday looking at people with beautiful clear cheeks...

That being said, though, I read your whole story, blushingman, and found it rather disturbing. Suicidal thoughts? "Dating isn't an option"? No social life? .........bro

I play in a live band. When the adrenaline kicks in, my face turns into a goddamn tomato up there on stage in front of everyone. But guess what? No one f*cking cares! Just embrace it. Accept it. No one's going to die because of your rosy cheeks.

I've f*cked bitches. I've been on tons of dates. I go out with my homies and hit on hot girls. Do I get rejected? Hell yea I do. Most shots I take are rejections. Is it cause of my rosy ass cheeks? Maybe. Who knows? Could be anything. Dudes who are olive-skinned perfect 10's get rejected all the time, too. It's all just a numbers game anyways. You might hit on 500 hot girls, and 499 reject you, but 1 rides your dick to the moon and back. That's a win!

Guys thinking you're gay cause it looks like you're blushing? Come on, man. No offense, but you're way too stuck in your head about this.

Again, I hate having this condition. It's a big insecurity of mine and I'd get rid of it if I could but I can't. But lemme tell you how I deal with it and how you should, too. 

Picture how you'd behave if you didn't have kprf, and do that. Pursue your dream, talk to hot girls.

Some people are quadriplegics, burn victims, retarded... You and me on the other hand, we have rosy cheeks. Wanna know what you're limited to doing with rosy cheeks? Literally whatever tf you wanna do!!

I'm not saying to pretend like you don't have them. I, on principle, believe that accepting reality will always ultimately lead to a happier existence. What I'm saying is that you don't have a rosy cheek problem. You simply have an insecurity problem.

I recommend doing these 3 key things to help you learn to love yourself and go for what you want in life despite some rosy cheeks:
1. pursue your dream
5a8242838d829_Photoon2-12-18at5_42PM.thumb.jpg.ce62df96ef3a94904baa5fdc87ba7025.jpg
2. develop good habits (and eliminate bad ones) [big ones for me have been lifting, meditation, nofap, reading, no video games/tv]
3. constantly expand your comfort zone

When you feel the flushing, when you feel your face lighting on fire in social situations (happens to me all the time), just embrace it, and realize that no one gives a fraction of the f*ck that you give. Don't try to leave or hide your face or start being all shy. Once you adopt this mindset of "oh well whatever" the flushing will happen less and it will be easier to deal with.

Hope that helps. 

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17 hours ago, davidc said:

Quick question: Does sun tanning undo the effects of the vbeam? Also, do you have to redo the vbeam treatment after a while, like does it wear off eventually? Asking cause I had it done and am stoked to have pink cheeks now rather than cherry red like before.

Also, I want to say something to ya'll that I feel no one else is saying. I have kprf just as bad as the next guy. It's some bull**** lemme tell ya. Pisses me off when I think too hard about it. I feel envious everyday looking at people with beautiful clear cheeks...

That being said, though, I read your whole story, blushingman, and found it rather disturbing. Suicidal thoughts? "Dating isn't an option"? No social life? .........bro

I play in a live band. When the adrenaline kicks in, my face turns into a goddamn tomato up there on stage in front of everyone. But guess what? No one f*cking cares! Just embrace it. Accept it. No one's going to die because of your rosy cheeks.

I've f*cked bitches. I've been on tons of dates. I go out with my homies and hit on hot girls. Do I get rejected? Hell yea I do. Most shots I take are rejections. Is it cause of my rosy ass cheeks? Maybe. Who knows? Could be anything. Dudes who are olive-skinned perfect 10's get rejected all the time, too. It's all just a numbers game anyways. You might hit on 500 hot girls, and 499 reject you, but 1 rides your dick to the moon and back. That's a win!

Guys thinking you're gay cause it looks like you're blushing? Come on, man. No offense, but you're way too stuck in your head about this.

Again, I hate having this condition. It's a big insecurity of mine and I'd get rid of it if I could but I can't. But lemme tell you how I deal with it and how you should, too. 

Picture how you'd behave if you didn't have kprf, and do that. Pursue your dream, talk to hot girls.

Some people are quadriplegics, burn victims, retarded... You and me on the other hand, we have rosy cheeks. Wanna know what you're limited to doing with rosy cheeks? Literally whatever tf you wanna do!!

I'm not saying to pretend like you don't have them. I, on principle, believe that accepting reality will always ultimately lead to a happier existence. What I'm saying is that you don't have a rosy cheek problem. You simply have an insecurity problem.

I recommend doing these 3 key things to help you learn to love yourself and go for what you want in life despite some rosy cheeks:
1. pursue your dream
5a8242838d829_Photoon2-12-18at5_42PM.thumb.jpg.ce62df96ef3a94904baa5fdc87ba7025.jpg
2. develop good habits (and eliminate bad ones) [big ones for me have been lifting, meditation, nofap, reading, no video games/tv]
3. constantly expand your comfort zone

When you feel the flushing, when you feel your face lighting on fire in social situations (happens to me all the time), just embrace it, and realize that no one gives a fraction of the f*ck that you give. Don't try to leave or hide your face or start being all shy. Once you adopt this mindset of "oh well whatever" the flushing will happen less and it will be easier to deal with.

Hope that helps. 

Sun tanning itself will not worsen your condition, however prolonged sun exposure that leads to flushing or sunburn will have a negative effect. I often use tanning salons to help mask the color of the redness. Use the standup ones and make sure there is a working fine inside and you should be okay. Using the salons I don't flush and I don't have to waste hours outside to get some color.

Many doctors state that flushing does not reverse the effects of VBeam but I'm not so sure I agree with that. I think the intense reoccurring flow of blood through those treated vessels can definitely cause them to slowly become more dilated.

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On 2/13/2018 at 1:43 AM, davidc said:

Quick question: Does sun tanning undo the effects of the vbeam? Also, do you have to redo the vbeam treatment after a while, like does it wear off eventually? Asking cause I had it done and am stoked to have pink cheeks now rather than cherry red like before.

Also, I want to say something to ya'll that I feel no one else is saying. I have kprf just as bad as the next guy. It's some bull**** lemme tell ya. Pisses me off when I think too hard about it. I feel envious everyday looking at people with beautiful clear cheeks...

That being said, though, I read your whole story, blushingman, and found it rather disturbing. Suicidal thoughts? "Dating isn't an option"? No social life? .........bro

I play in a live band. When the adrenaline kicks in, my face turns into a goddamn tomato up there on stage in front of everyone. But guess what? No one f*cking cares! Just embrace it. Accept it. No one's going to die because of your rosy cheeks.

I've f*cked bitches. I've been on tons of dates. I go out with my homies and hit on hot girls. Do I get rejected? Hell yea I do. Most shots I take are rejections. Is it cause of my rosy ass cheeks? Maybe. Who knows? Could be anything. Dudes who are olive-skinned perfect 10's get rejected all the time, too. It's all just a numbers game anyways. You might hit on 500 hot girls, and 499 reject you, but 1 rides your dick to the moon and back. That's a win!

Guys thinking you're gay cause it looks like you're blushing? Come on, man. No offense, but you're way too stuck in your head about this.

Again, I hate having this condition. It's a big insecurity of mine and I'd get rid of it if I could but I can't. But lemme tell you how I deal with it and how you should, too. 

Picture how you'd behave if you didn't have kprf, and do that. Pursue your dream, talk to hot girls.

Some people are quadriplegics, burn victims, retarded... You and me on the other hand, we have rosy cheeks. Wanna know what you're limited to doing with rosy cheeks? Literally whatever tf you wanna do!!

I'm not saying to pretend like you don't have them. I, on principle, believe that accepting reality will always ultimately lead to a happier existence. What I'm saying is that you don't have a rosy cheek problem. You simply have an insecurity problem.

I recommend doing these 3 key things to help you learn to love yourself and go for what you want in life despite some rosy cheeks:
1. pursue your dream
5a8242838d829_Photoon2-12-18at5_42PM.thumb.jpg.ce62df96ef3a94904baa5fdc87ba7025.jpg
2. develop good habits (and eliminate bad ones) [big ones for me have been lifting, meditation, nofap, reading, no video games/tv]
3. constantly expand your comfort zone

When you feel the flushing, when you feel your face lighting on fire in social situations (happens to me all the time), just embrace it, and realize that no one gives a fraction of the f*ck that you give. Don't try to leave or hide your face or start being all shy. Once you adopt this mindset of "oh well whatever" the flushing will happen less and it will be easier to deal with.

Hope that helps. 

Hi David

I created an account on here to thank you for this motivational post. It really put things into perspective. I have same kprf as you from the pic. It looks like you have a good beard line. Did you ever try growing beard to cover up the redness? Unfortunately my beard is patchy on one side for some reason so i'm unable to grow beard to cover it up.

I've been reading about the vbeam. How much did it cost you and how many sessions did you need. Wondering how long it lasts too. If it reduces redness for awhile be worth it.

Have you tried the rhofade cream yet that restricts the blood vessels on the face for 12 hours. There is stories of rebound redness happening with these products so im little hesitant to try it. Although its for rosacea it should work for kprf. (For years i believed i rosacea when in fact i had kprf which i never heard about before).

Thanks again for this inspiring post, Like you say its really all in the head. If you dont mind about the flushing then there is less chance of it happening. Meditiation also helped me also.

Cheers

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On 2/23/2018 at 5:18 AM, BBB said:

@BBB the vbeam was $325 per session. I had 4, but I think the 4th may have been a waste of money since I didn't see much improvement after the 3rd. No, I haven't tried rhofade cream. Never even heard of it. I haven't had a beard for the past year n a half cause I work at resort where they don't allow it. When I did it didn't really hide much. Doesn't grow very well on my cheeks.

Seriously, I don't think that having a red face is really that big of a deal. Rosy skin has been very prominent in anglo people throughout the millennia. Stop comparing yourself to people. Stop complacently accepting the media's perfect archetype of how humans should look. The comparison game is unbeatable. If you had beautiful olive skin, you'd just find something else to beat yourself up over as long as you're strongly identified with your self image.

 

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I was really interested in comments about writing to doctors etc to make them the severity of this so called “harmless and benign”condition and the impact on the whole of your like, with the hope of more researchthe I read through with all that has been tried, and it is so sad that many things aren’t successful. In the last week I have decided to be more active and have written to some of the doctors who were  part of a couple of studies that have been done on Keratosis. I explained what it is like for those with KPRF and the impact on the lives of those with it, and expressed the desire for more studies to be done. 

Both replied...One doctor is a research doctor who said they were planning more studies so they would consider doing more on KPRF

The other is a dermatologist who is a director of an American hospital who replied to my 3 emails. He expressed his frustration that there was limited research into this problem and was interested that what I was expressing was just like a case of a 17 year he was trying to help. He was limited to trialling things that would improve the condition as much as possible and back g it up with the team of psychiatrists they worked with, though many patients refuse that help. He would pass on my desire for more research to his colleagues and sent me links to medical Journals. My aim is to write toany of the doctors who have written anything at all about KP, KPR, KPRF.  It would be good to write but maybe we should work out a letter and agree what should be  put on it to make our efforts more of a team effort and consistent in what we think needs to be done .  Any one else written to someone and who?

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On 2/13/2018 at 1:43 AM, davidc said:

Quick question: Does sun tanning undo the effects of the vbeam? Also, do you have to redo the vbeam treatment after a while, like does it wear off eventually? Asking cause I had it done and am stoked to have pink cheeks now rather than cherry red like before.

Also, I want to say something to ya'll that I feel no one else is saying. I have kprf just as bad as the next guy. It's some bull**** lemme tell ya. Pisses me off when I think too hard about it. I feel envious everyday looking at people with beautiful clear cheeks...

That being said, though, I read your whole story, blushingman, and found it rather disturbing. Suicidal thoughts? "Dating isn't an option"? No social life? .........bro

I play in a live band. When the adrenaline kicks in, my face turns into a goddamn tomato up there on stage in front of everyone. But guess what? No one f*cking cares! Just embrace it. Accept it. No one's going to die because of your rosy cheeks.

I've f*cked bitches. I've been on tons of dates. I go out with my homies and hit on hot girls. Do I get rejected? Hell yea I do. Most shots I take are rejections. Is it cause of my rosy ass cheeks? Maybe. Who knows? Could be anything. Dudes who are olive-skinned perfect 10's get rejected all the time, too. It's all just a numbers game anyways. You might hit on 500 hot girls, and 499 reject you, but 1 rides your dick to the moon and back. That's a win!

Guys thinking you're gay cause it looks like you're blushing? Come on, man. No offense, but you're way too stuck in your head about this.

Again, I hate having this condition. It's a big insecurity of mine and I'd get rid of it if I could but I can't. But lemme tell you how I deal with it and how you should, too. 

Picture how you'd behave if you didn't have kprf, and do that. Pursue your dream, talk to hot girls.

Some people are quadriplegics, burn victims, retarded... You and me on the other hand, we have rosy cheeks. Wanna know what you're limited to doing with rosy cheeks? Literally whatever tf you wanna do!!

I'm not saying to pretend like you don't have them. I, on principle, believe that accepting reality will always ultimately lead to a happier existence. What I'm saying is that you don't have a rosy cheek problem. You simply have an insecurity problem.

I recommend doing these 3 key things to help you learn to love yourself and go for what you want in life despite some rosy cheeks:
1. pursue your dream
5a8242838d829_Photoon2-12-18at5_42PM.thumb.jpg.ce62df96ef3a94904baa5fdc87ba7025.jpg
2. develop good habits (and eliminate bad ones) [big ones for me have been lifting, meditation, nofap, reading, no video games/tv]
3. constantly expand your comfort zone

When you feel the flushing, when you feel your face lighting on fire in social situations (happens to me all the time), just embrace it, and realize that no one gives a fraction of the f*ck that you give. Don't try to leave or hide your face or start being all shy. Once you adopt this mindset of "oh well whatever" the flushing will happen less and it will be easier to deal with.

Hope that helps. 

This is pretty much exactly how I've lived my life, I went through the self isolation in my late teens and I've slowly got myself to a happy and place and the future looks even happier. I work in retail, have loads of fun with my colleagues and customers, been in a relationship for 5 half years and only been single for about 2 and a half years in the last 13 years, I have loads of hobbies and pastimes I love.

 

 

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Hello @davidc

Thank you for your post. Although I appreciate your post, I have to say that I strongly disagree with you. What you are talking about is basing your confidence on something external, and not genuinely having confidence. Sure, you can get better with the opposite sex from experience, and get more confidence. But the approach you are talking about can easily become a negative addiction. I mean, it’s like getting a beer. Sure, you get more confident for a while, but then you need a new beer. Same with getting laid. Perhaps you feel extra confident for a week. But then you constantly have to go out and get laid every week, and feel bad, should you not succeed. Don’t get me wrong; I used to think like you; Trying everything to get more confident, since this (wrongly in my opinion) often is viewed as a psychological condition. Instead, I think you should deal with the actual problem, and not mask it with external pleasures. That, in my opinion, is dealing with the actual problem; chronic blushing, which in my opinion first and foremost is a physical condition. 

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Hello, everyone.  

I have been waiting to update, because I have been gathering experience after going through with a new procedure, and wanting to see the results from it. I have some great news, and I am super glad I can share this with all of you. Having had this as a mission for over 10 years trying out EVERYTHING I could think of, traveling to different countries, etc., I feel extremely knowledgeable of the subject. 

The short version: I finally had the ESB/ETS-surgery done. It was the best decision of my life, and I am just sad I did not have this done sooner. Had I the opportunity to do it again, I at least would have had it done before college. 

Instead of making this one huge post, I will divide it up in several different posts, categorized, to make it easier to read whatever is most interesting to you. Also note, I get nothing from giving away this information. I am solely back here because I know what a painful thing this can be, and I want to contribute and give as much information as possible.

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I rarely read negative comments of the surgery now a days. The negative posts I have seen are often just a few of the same people, who had the surgery done decades ago (When it was way different, and with less advanced medical equipment). But before giving my story, here are some thoughts from other people who have had the surgery done. They did not want to make public posts, but have contacted me through personal messenger (Their names are edited out):

1:

Hi,

The success rate today is around 90%, so its good odds. Like you said, most of successful stories are never written about because they are finished with the problem. the 10% of the not successful once are thoose you find in the forums. For me I didn't care about what other people said. I just understood that for me it was impossible to live in the blushing situation. I would rather kill myself than to live with it. So my decision was pretty easy. 

In my home country there was 6 months in que for the surgery, and I needed it earlier because of some big social events I were going to attend the next weeks. I searched for ETS surgeons in Europe, and I found one in Rome. It was the first one I found and it looked good. So I sent an email and got an appointment the next week. I booked flight tickets and hotel right away. The next week I was blush free, with some pain. The pain went away after a couple of weeks. 

I am not sure if there is any difference, but its probably good to go with a experienced one who have done alot of ETS surgeries before.  

They did clamps on me. 

2:

 I am glad to say I have had no problem with CS even on hot days in the UK.

Below are the details of my ETS surgery.
 I had my surgery done privately at the Hospital of St John & St Elizabeth in London. Dr David Greenstein was the surgeon. The breakdown of costs are as below:
1) Initial consultation £275
2) Surgery deposit to Dr Greenstein £500 (waiting time usually 2/3 months. I got a cancellation after 2 1/2 months wait). 
3) Surgery cost to Dr Greenstein £3050
4) Hospital fees for 1 overnight stay £1550 (you can leave a few hours after surgery if you are accompanied and save on the overnight stay cost).
Total £5375 + Hotel/Travel Costs.
Dr Greenstein has performed ETS over 1000 times. I initially asked about clipping but he said in his experience if you want to never blush again T2/T3 cutting is the only solution. (also clips eventually fall off due to lung movement so it is expensive and potentially temporary). He did explain about side effects, mainly CS but said it was a bit of a lottery. So far I am delighted and have very mild side effects. I know this can change but I am hopeful my side effects stay mild. I also asked about nerve regrowth but he said it was very unlikely, he cuts along the T2 & T3 rib lines to make sure all required nerves are cut (including the Kuntz). Dr Greenstein said patients nerves grow like tree roots so cutting along the rib lines makes sure the nerves are cut as everyone's nerve structure is different. This I think is why some people have ETS but still blush as the surgeon has missed some of the required nerves.
If you need any more information just message me.

3) 

I had the surgery June 1, 2016. It changed my life. It is literally impossible to blush. Your body just doesn't allow it because the thoracic region was destroyed. In terms of side effects, nothing really. When I play hockey are work out the sweat that used to go to my face now goes to my back. Would recommend the surgery to any one suffering from facial blushing, knowing for 13 years how debilitating it can be. Good luck! 

I haven't been on this site since the surgery but got an email saying I had a message. Can't believe it's been less than a year I had it done. Wow 

I used to feel the hot blush coming on and even someone saying my name unexpectedly would set the blush off. Mine could last a couple hours. Often if I was working I would need to find a quiet place and take a tranquilizer for it to subside. Even the thought of blushing could have me blushing for minutes without anyone in the room. All I can is I haven't had side effects. Physically I feel great. Mentally more motivated because I'm not avoiding my days but pushing to further my career. Sexually there have been no change. I sweat more on my back but it's more like an average person would sweat. What you would expect after exercise. If you have the money and your days are consumed with avoidance and not being able to express yourself in a group environment than at least you now know there is an option out there that like I mentioned 90% of the time works great. So if it ever becomes to big of a problem to manage there's hope! 

1)the surgeon cut at the T2 level (this surgeon does not clamp anyway because once clamped the damage is irreparable anyway)

2) Dr Gorenstein

Basically used to blush all the time. Even thinking someone might talk to me with others watching made me blush. Since surgery I cannot blush. Not one person has mentioned any redness since the surgery. I even got a very good office job where meetings happen all the time. Even the swearing has gone away with time. I really got lucky in this it worked and don't see any negative side effects. 

Good luck! Cheers! 

4)

Hi mate 

No trouble at all in answering!

It's been almost 9 years (hard to believe it's that long!) since I had ETS surgery. I wouldn't say I've 'blushed' (hate that word!) at all really since that time, in the basic sense. However, I can still get red when nervous etc, more on my neck and chest. But it isn't as bad as it use to be.
Before the surgery, you could argue I wouldn't flare up or blush at all most the time. But that was because I hid away from things, or had a job where I was in a kind of comfort zone. I wasn't one of these people who would go red at the drop of a hat and consistently in that regards. But when it happened. It happened! My whole neck and chest and face would be like a blanket of redness, and the heat sensation was really bad too. It was certainly way worse than it was post-op! It can still happen though, and it bothers me at times. But it still isn't as bad as it use to be.
The thing is. Is that before surgery, even if I didn't always go red. I knew the chances were high that it could happen, it was the fear factor of it as well, that made matters worse. Like any affliction, the more you think and obsess about something, the more it can happen!
I don't have any problem with dry hands. Sometimes I can still get a bit of moisture on them slightly at times.
In regards to the CS, it isn't really that bad at all. Although it can be bad at times during the summer months. I can get sweat on my lower stomach, but the worst areas is the back. But it's only really during the summer it can be a problem. It might of gotten worse a few years after my surgery. But then that may of been due to me getting panicky about other things at times and making it worse!
I'm not sure what level I had cut. I don't think the surgeon told me. It was a different technique compared to what others use I think. Where are you planning on having the surgery if you do? I'm happy to answer any other questions for you!
I would encourage surgery. But I know it's tough because of the side-effects. And you obviously have to consider them. But it's basically about whether or not you feel and believe you're going to be happy currently ever without surgery, or only if you take the chance of surgery and it being successful? Some people can be fortunate with it, other's not in regards to the side-effects. It's always the way though. You get your hopes up, then something kills that! But I took the plunge. Speaking from experience too, in general. It's better to do it sooner rather than later. The older you get, the more painful regrets you have!

5)

Hi!

Thank you for your message! I plan to visit the links you supplied and read some of your questions there when I find a little bit of time. For now, I answered questions included at the bottom of your message. 

1. Blushing before the surgery. Yes—exactly like yours. Your description perfectly matches the features of my blushing. Once my blushing response was initiated, it powerfully flamed up my cheeks (and ears, neck, chest) in seconds. I would experience sudden intense bright red blushing, with the accompanying pulsing facial heat—horrible feeling. When this happened, it could sometimes take hours in my case for the blush to subside and return to baseline. As you mentioned, presentations were absolute disasters for me. The anticipation of the presentation (or social situations) could get me completely flared up.  

2. Side effects. The main one is the sweating. It mainly occurs on my upper back and chest in my case. I would characterize it as “occasionally annoying”. 

In the summer, I usually wear short-sleeve buttoned cotton shirts for work or going out. Wearing a thin white cotton t-shirt underneath is sufficient to prevent any bleed through in all but the worst heat. I carry water on very hot days and manage things pretty well. When I run or work out, I wear what I want—no problem. I notice that the sweating tends to activate when I immediately transition to a warmer setting from a colder one… Once I am in the hotter setting after a few minutes, I settle back to baseline. I could certainly be more aggressive in combatting the sweating in the summer if I wanted to—there are high-powered anti-perspirants, etc. I currently don’t use anything except normal deodorant. Armpits can still sweat no problem. Head, arms, and hands do not sweat much since the surgery.  Do you live in a very hot climate? I am in Canada (Montreal), where it is “cold” between ~October and April/May, so this geographic aspect is favorable. 

My hands are dry but this is fine; it’s just like touching your arm or something. I can’t see any problem holding someone’s hand. I’ve noticed that in cool settings, the hands can sometimes feel a little cold. 

3. Titanium clamps—but I forget the details. My surgery was with Dr. E. Spratt (Toronto, 2001). Whatever his standard was for patients with blushing-only symptoms is what I would have received. 

Hopefully some of this information is insightful. I am happy to answer any other questions and look forward to reading your story using the links you provided.

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My own surgery experience 

I had the surgery done over 6 months ago, using titanium clamps. It is called ESB (endoscopic sympathetic block) or ETS-C (The same thing. ETS, but without the cutting or burning, only clamps).  

Side effects: 

I have not noticed any severe side effects at all. Perhaps a bit drier hands, but not like I have to use moisturizer more than before. The sweat that used to go to the head when working out, now mostly goes to the back. I wasn’t a heavy face-sweater before anyway, so it is basically the same back sweat as before also. 

Blushing:

95% gone. It is basically gone, and when it happens it is in no way near how it was before. It is to a degree that I never have to think about it, and it is nothing socially or professionally I avoid because of this condition. So, in that sense, the surgery was a 100 % success. 

The surgeon confirmed my hypothesis about beta blockers being a good indicator for whether the surgery will work or not. Both Propranolol and Atenolol worked great for me, curing it almost to the same degree as the surgery. However, it only worked for a couple of hours and also gave horrible side effects of fatigue (Which the surgey don’t do). But, this might be something you could try, as an indication for knowing with greater certainty if you are a candidate for the surgery.  

Procedure:

I had clips put on at the T2- level. They used several clips, to make sure they block the so called Kuntz nerves. Some surgeons call this T2 + T3, while others call it extended T2 blockage. This seems to be the new norm, and is also what I have read people who are happy with the results of procedure to have had done. 

(Note: At least T2 is needed to be blocked when the symptom of your over active nervous system is chronic blushing, while only T3 is needed when the symptom of your over active nervous system is chronic hand sweating). 

Advice after the surgery 

The surgeon was very clear on that, should you get severe side effects, you should notice this shortly after the surgery. Hence, the so called “honeymoon face”, is according to him, a made up term within forums. I have not seen these term in any published medical journals, so I trust him on this one. Therefor, should you really regret the surgey, you can have the clips removed (Must be done within a couple of months).  

However, I would give myself some time before deciding if you want to remove the clips or not. First, do not even think about how your body is the first week. You hve just been through an operation, so the body will need some time to adjust to the change, and will feel a bit strange the first week. Also, the sweating sensation will be a bit different. For instance, the day after the surgery, walking around with a lot of luggage at the bus station during the summer, it felt as I sweated more than usual on the lower body. Had this been when I was 17, I would have freaked out. Having lived longer than this, I could see that this is how I always is during summer time, when walking around with a lot of clothes and luggage (It is like a light workout, so it is completely normal, it is the body’s way of cooling down). It was just that the sensation was a bit different, and for me I could feel it more on my legs than before (Whch again, was probably just since the body was adjusting). After a couple of weeks, I did not notice this whatsoever. I would give it a month, and then decide. If you now really have bad side effects, then wait no more than a month before having them removed.  

My best advice once you have had the surgery is give yourself a couple of months for the body to adjust, and then get into as good habits as possible. If you are not doing this already, you should get into a good routine of eating healthy and working out (At least 4 times a week). All science point towards this being super healthy, and particularly since the surgery can lower the heart rate somewhat, to keep up workouts becomes even more important. I would also stick to some of the same routines you had before the surgery, like just take a year to work as normal (And perhaps celebrate and by som new clothes or something). What I did wrong was that I was so happy that the surgery worked so well, that I took on way too much. The months after the surgery the body really needed to rest and sleep more, and then when taking on extra projects, both in terms of work, school and outside school activities, that became too much. Then I decided to do this instead of keeping up with the workoout routine, which was a bad choice. So learn from my mistakes on this one J

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SSRI/SNRI vs Beta Blockers 

Having tried different versions within both categories, I don’t have too much positive to say about SSRI/SNRI. Nothing negative either, it is just that they do nothing about the nervous system (And chronic blushing comes from an overactive nervous system). Unless you are one of those people who started to blush because you were anxious and depressed, I do not think these will work too great (And this condition is not chronic blushing, just an extention of and depressed/anxious state). However, there are people on this forum claiming that SSRI/SNRI have helped their chronic blushing, so if you really want to give these a try, the two types I can recommend is Effexor/Venlafaxine and Paxil/Paroxetine. Overall those are the two types that seems to be mentioned from people on the forum in terms of giving the best help, and they also worked the best for me as well (And gave the least side effects).  

This being said, I don’t wiev using SSRI/SNRI as a negative. Even if you have the surgey done, when you have lived with an overactive nervous system for many years, helping the brain/hormones with SSRI/SNRI I think only can be good. Also, the lowest dosage of both Venlafaxine and Paroxetine gave me no negative side effects, as well as providing positive effects (Like reducing flushing). 

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Debunking the myths of the surgery

There are all kinds of horror stories about the surgery. After reading about this surgery for over a decade, my thoughts are that they either are; (1) false, (2) are made of people who had it done several decades ago, when the procedure were different and/or (3) those misfortunuates who are dissatisfied with the surgery are the ones that keep coming back to complain at forums (I myself would never take the time to do this had I just been thinking about myself, I only come back because I know there is need for peple wanting this information. I think most people who have a problem seek out a solution, read about the surgery, has it done and then move on with their life. Most people with this condition may never even find a forum like this in the first place). 

For instance, Horner’s syndrom. I think the surgeon who did the procedure on me, said he had done over 1000 surgeries, and he had only one insident of Horner’s. This you spot immidietly, so he simply removed the clip and put it further down (Since people are somewhat anatomically different, and Horner’s is caused by clamping T1). Over the next couple of months, the Horner’s went away completely. 

Here are the actual possible side effects:

·      Somewhat drier face and hands

o  My experience, people who more lately (not many decades ago) had the surgery and most importanly – the scientific evidence – proves this to be minor. In most cases you only need to use moisturizer an extra time a week than usual. 

·      A few percentages lower heart rate

o  This is for most patients actually a welcomed side effect. Since you have lived with an overactive fight and flight reponse for years, this has a positive calming effective. It could also make it so that you do not need heart medications when you get elderly. 

·      CS (Compensatory sweating) 

o  This seems to be the most dreaded side effect, and also the most overrated side effect. For many people they only notice the shift when working out; that you sweat little or nothing in the face when working out, and more on the back. Otherwise there is no greater change. Seems this comes a lot down to if you are a upper body swater before the surgery or not. But, the side effect is real, considering the somewhat change in sweating patterns, and should of course be taken in to account when deciding on going for the surgery or not.  

·      Gustatory sweating 

o  Meaning sweating of the forehead when eating spicy food. This sounded like a bad side effect, just reading about it before the surgery. My, and other people on forums, experience is often that this is a welcomed side effect. You sort of now have the option to sweat from the upper body or not. So, you could eat spicy food before a heavy work out, if you miss the head sweat when working out. 

·      Horner’s syndrome

o  Should be mentioned, since it can happen. But again, with today’s method, the probability is like 0,1 %. This you can read as basically non existense. There are absoultely no surgeries in the world that can not give complications. If you are not even willing to take that kind of risks, I can guarantee you that the chronic blushing you have is not really chronic blushing (Since you would do almost anything to get rid of it), and you are not a good candidate for the surgery anyway. 

All other side effects have no scientific basis what so ever. 

EVERYTHING else is hoaxes. This is not me making this up, but me trying to shine a light on what medical experts and medical journals actually say about the subject. Also, this is also what testimonals given by more recent surgical applicants say about the subject. Take the honey moon phase for instanse, that was not even heard of by the surgeon. He was quite the opposite, very clear on that you will know the side effects within the first month, which is why he chose to use the clamping vs the cutting/burning method. Take impotence for example; that is a side effect of depression, NOT the surgery. If you are depressed because of your chronic blushing and have impotence, just having the surgery done, and keep on living like you did before, will of course not change that physical symptome. You will also need to make some lifestyle changes and start living life more. And that is actually what happens from what I have read from both messages and testimonials. People are so happy that they don’t have to live with chronic blushing and can be themselves, that they have more sex than ever J 

Another common myth is that you become more emotionless. Again, there is no scientific evidence to support this, and both mine and all recent testimonials say the complete opposite. Before I would avoid situations and put up a mask to don’t feel too much, and therefor not trigger the chronic blushing. With that fear gone, I am able to be present in the situation, and allow myself to take in what is happening more, and therefor both cry and laugh more. Look, the only thing the surgey do is make it so that the fight and flight don’t get overly triggered. And again, for 99 % of people in today’s society this is a welcomed gift. Since most of us are not farmers out fighting siber tought tigers, but actually are in business environments where networking and giving presentations are the new standards, it is actually BETTER not having this response going of all the time. 

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Is there someone with this condition, who still should not have the surgery done? 

Of course, before deciding, you should take every aspect into account. After all, it is a surgery, and all surgeries have possible complications. And when reading about the actual side effects you could get (based on real scientific evidence, not some fictional story on a forum) you will read that chances of strong CS increases if you before the surgery were a heavy face sweater. But let’s say you think you are a good candidate for the surgery, are there any final considerations to be made? I think there are two: The first is if you think you are able to be a professional athlete. Let me get this straight, there is NO PROBLEM working out at a high and intense level after the surgery. But if you plan on becoming the new Usain Bolt, you neeed every competative advantage you could get. Since the surgey can reduce the heart rate slightly, that might make it so that you cross the finish line a second later. This means nothing to 99 % of people, but for an athelete, seconds matter a lot. The second reason is if you live in an extreme humid country. I personally don’t know how this would be, but I imagine you sweat a lot before the surgey anyways, so it might not make a big difference. But, that is of course something that could increase the CS. If this is the case, knowing how bad chronic blushing is, I think I would consider moving and have the surgery done. At least take the CS aspect in to extra account because of the extreme climate you live in. 

 

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Thoughts on natural solutions

Like I have mentioned before, I do not think there is much natural you can do for curing this. I stand by that this first and foremost is a physical condition, so that means going for a physical solution. I mean, going for a natural solutions would be the same as thinking positively and having cognitive therapy if you have cancer. It can make you feel better, but it will not cure your cancer. 

This being said, I do feel you could come to the point when you get so grounded in yourself that you simply don’t care at all anymore. However, this I think would require a lot from your part, involving going through tramautic experiences voluntarily. Having lived with this condition for more than 10 years, the months after the surgery were abosluteley amazing. Then I had a new traumatizing experience, that would make a lot of people want to kill themselves. But, at least I have experienzed a couple of months of my life, without the feeling of trauma of the body. The insight I got from this experiense however, is that I think I really understand how cognitive therapy would be needed to be done, if it were to work for not caring of chronic blushing anymore. If you voulenterely put yourself through humiliating and traumatizing experienzes, where you would blush as much as humanly possible, again and again. After a while, you become so used to it, that you are so grounded in yourself that you simply do not care at all what other (negative) people comment and say about you. But this would require playing full out. Going to nude beaches, PUA’s have this thing to get confidence that is walking on the street and suddenly shouting: “Thank god, my feet do not stink today”, taking on speech classes, and doing something new daily. It would have to be something like this. Just going to a shrink and doing some exersizes a couple of times a month is not going to cut it. 

Some other natural things that can work I think is: 

-      Surround yourself with supporitve and positive people that you trust, and you know has your best intention at heart. 

-      Meditate (or pray - use the language that best fits your preference)

-      Challenge yourself, but also celebrate your wins. And if you are with people, be in an environment where you are celebrated for challenging yourself and not criticized for it.  

It is ironic that when we are young and at our most vulnarebly, that you often ar put in the worst kind of environments (Like with other high school kids, that are struggling with insecurities themselves, and often take it out negatevily on other poeople). It is in those years it becomes extra important being around supportive people, both for your mental and physical development. Of course you can learn from the past and make changes later, but the sooner you make this happen, the better (Also, I realize that you do not always have a choice in the matter. You do not chose the family you are born in to, nor how the people at school are. I myself lacked the feeling of safety in both places, and growing up the feeling of safety is extremely important. However, you are capable of seeking out as positive of an environment as possible. Also, even though you can not chose the environment, you can chose how you respond to the environemnt. This you learn as you grow up, but the sooner you get this lesson, the better. Then you more and more can stop caring what people, of those that has opinions that is not worth listening to, think and say. And actually, with that attitude, you can use an negative environment as an opportunity to build character and make yourself stronger. Then you have even more to give to those people that are worth your time.). 

-      Just a side note: It is hard seeing this when you are young, but a lot of people actually do their best, given the knowledge they have at that current stage of their life. We come in to this life, not knowing anything. Like I said, we do not chose the family or environment we are put in, but grow and learn, and (hopefully) most of the douchbags at high school have grown to better human beings as they got older. This is not your concern however, and not a justification for bad behaviour in other people (an destructive behaviour is still an destructive behaviour, and should not be tolerated), it is just an observation of humanity. 

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Thoughts on this being a inherited condtion vs because of environmental factors 

Skin conditions like KPRF and Rosacea is without a doubt due to inheridence. Chronic blushing however I think is more of a combination. Like, with some sort of cancer types. If your parents has it, you get a 50 % greater chanse of getting it yourself. If you then grow up in an environment that triggers it, then you can get it. I have read that an over active nervous system can be caused by childhood traumas. And if you read about how we physically are the first 15 years after we are born, you will find that we for instance automatically are in alpha and theta brain wave states, which makes us very impressionable. How we get treated, by our parents and overall environment, is so crucial for our mental and physical development. But again, like I have written before, some people get chronic hand sweating, some chronic blushing and others nothing at all, so therefor I think this first and foremost comes down to genes.  

For me personally there has not been too much physical abuse, but mostly mental/emotional. I have a father who always have screamed at me, and also not having clear rules or regulations, so he would constantly find ways of going into rage mode and take it out on the kids. And a mother who is overly emotionally controlling and manipulating. And they both have in common that they never would apologize for things they did wrong to me. To this day, I have never heard them say “I am sorry” or apologizing for anything at all. Whenever they did something wrong, their way of dealing with it was just the next day to pretend that it hadn’t happen. This made me walk on egg shells all my life, not knowing when the next “mental attack would be”. I have also done well in school, but when junior high starts, kids at that age are not always the nicest. I even had a teacher who liked making fun of her students. So now, even though I really liked school, this started to become a nightmare. What saved me was living close to my grandparents where we could focus on school, but even more importantly I have always been good at learning, so I could find peace at a library, doing school work and also reading a lot of other books, like business books, biographies, etc. As well as finding good role models, both in the books, but also through internet, meeting people who inspired me, etc. The thing is, you don’t notice abuse when you grow up with it, because you think it is normal. This is called the Stockholm’s syndrome. It is just when you grow up and can relate to other people, and notice how it is possible to treat other people, how people can choose to react differently to the exact same situation, that you realize that everyone (including your parents) had a choice in how they raised their kids. In my case, seeing parents not constantly screaming at their kid. Also, seeing how they treat my much younger brother. It is sad to see how my mother put him through a massive guilt trips, as soon as he for instance doesn´t believe in the exact same superstitions as herself. This you do not notice growing up, and can only notice once you are a grown up (And the body, including chronic blushing, is developed). I do not think my own kids will ever get this condition, since I would never treat my kids the way I have been treated. But, if this were to first and foremost be and inherited condition, I will have no problem recommending this surgery to my own kids, knowing how great it is and with such few side effects. 

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Other solutions and advice

Listen to scientific evidence, not people claiming to know something when they really don’t. For instance: When at the gym, there is always some overweight person going around giving health advice. Unless of course he is an expert in the field, and happen to recover from a surgery or something, this is not the person you should listen to. You should listen to actual scientific evidence on how to get in shape, people who have made the same transformation that you yourself want to have, etc. Same with medical problems. When hearing about the surgery, I listended more to my parents (even though they know nothing of medicine, and for some reason it was extremely important to them that I did not go through with the surgery) and the few haters online, than myself, actual scientific evidence, all the surgons who have studied and performed this for decades and all the positive testimonials online. It was actually not until I got older, and having subjects of statistics at university, and reading more about medicine, that I realized how you should read side effects with asociated probabilites. First, in medicine they have to list absolutely everything that CAN happen. Also, percentages under one, you almost can read as zero. Even more so if you go for the clamping method. Also, a 95 % success rate is extremely high (Note, it is not this high, if you are over 40 years old, as some studies show the succes rate declines somewhat as you age). But, there are few heavy surgeries with a 100 % succes rate, and 95 % is very good. 

Another thing I would recommend is Melanotan 2. Not for doing anything about chronic blushing, but it helps a lot with the KP part of KPRF, and it creates a greater tan than you ever could get before, and it also keeps you from getting sunburned. I do not know which countries this is medically approved. It is my understanding that it only is approved in some countries, but legal to consume in most countries. So you will have to check this out yourself, but there is a lot of things that could benefit humanity that is not yet medically approved and other things that have been approved that should be changed (Like, slavery used to be legal, so you can not always use legality as a sense of what is right and wrong). In this case however, as a conusmer, you do not break any laws anyways. Another thing to think about: There are conspiracy theories that there are better cures for illnesses, like cancer, but medical companies profit more from keeping humanity ill and giving them today’s offers, instead of focusing on stuff that could erase the ilness for good (Like CRISPR). Same with a pill like in the movie Limitless. That there is a somewhat similar pill, but it work so well, that one elite want to keep it to themselves, instead of sharing it with humanity. I am not saying this is the case, but I feel like this is what has been done with Melanotan 2. Think about this: It was developed over 40 years ago as a cure for melanoma. Every test approval showed great results, it gives all kinds of positive effects, with almost no side effects. Is has been consumed all around the world for all these 40 years, without any rapports of negative side effects. Yet, all of a sudden medical companies just stoped publishing new rapports about it, and governments didn’t approve it. 

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Best advice I can give for those who still do not want to go for the surgery 

Having had the surgey, and trying everything else, there is little I can suggest that compares to this. Beta blockers worked great, but not for a full day and gave fatigue side efects, which the surgery didn’t. However, if your problem only is a couple of times a month, for instance before giving a speech, then beta blockers are great.  

The future can of course provide better solutions, both in terms of curing this and with less side effects. But, just waiting out is not a good solution. We don’t know if it is a couple of years or 30 years until the next better solution becomes available. I would go with the best possible solution that is available today, and then rather working and investing towards better solution for the future, so that the next generation do not have to go through the same suffering as we did. 

One thing that can work great, particularly if you are a girl (or a guy not bothering about this showing), is covering up this with makeup. There are som great types out there, and if this is something you want to do, I would look into the so called “medical make up”, like Vichy Dermablend. 

Otherwise the only thing I can suggest is the “hardcore version” of cognitive therapy mentioned above, and here of course you can add a low dose SSRI/SNRI when talking with your shrink.  

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Things to stay away from 

If you have read through my posts, you know my experience of different possible solutions, as well as information based on other sources of things I have read. Some do not work at all, others work somewhat, while other solutions work great, but only for a short period of time or within certain contexts.

Things to stay completely away from are things like homeopathy. Other things, like lasers, do work somewhat. But again, you need to spend a lot of money and a couple of years of your life, just for like a 20-30 % reduction. 

It will be up to you, but hopefully my over 10 year struggle with this, and trying out everything that could be of help, does so that you do not have to do the same thing. The best advice I can give is trying out the things I have mentioned that actually do work, and new solutions that has been proven scientifically to work (should such solutions come), and don’t bother spending money and time on anything else. 

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Life advices and wisdom gained 

Like the Nike’s slogan say; just do it! If you have a problem that really is hindering you in your day to day life, do what you can to find a solution for it. Life is too short to wait, and be willing to accept some risk. Like J.K. Rowling says; if you live too cautiously, you mught as well not have lived at all. The world is not perfect, we get everything from cancer to blindness, which are horrible things, but something we strive to cure for good. But regardless of what it is that you are suffering with, basically every solution come with some sort of risk. I believe there are types of cancers where the available solutions only give you a 10 % success rate. But, you go through with it, because that is the situation you have been put it. So, a 95 % success rate of curing chronic blushing, in surgical terms, is actually extremely high.

If I could give advice to my younger self, or any other young people reading this, I would do everything I could to build up myself. That is not selfish, quite the opposite. That makes it so that you can be more of yourself, and have more to offer to the world and all the people you meet. This for me first and foremost includes building up knowledge and skills + money and work experience, and put that everything to use. I realize that the younger you are, the harder it is to do the second part (But not impossible!). But, you may have to suffer through some of the high school years. But, I would not rush into college after high school. If I were to do it again, I would take on 3 jobs, work day and night, and take care of every possible thing about myself that I could. Going for everything from the ESB surgery to eye surgery so that you don’t need glasses, and then sort of really start living when starting college. But again, you may very well be able to find solutions before this. You can start online businesses, part time jobs also at junior high, etc. And of course the library and internet provides tons of opportunities for knowledge and skills, free of charge, so there is no need to wait for that part. And know, IT WILL BE OK. You are not alone of having this, so don’t give up, put in the work, and know that you will have this fixed before you know it!

Once this is solved, you will want to go on and live your life to the fullest. This is of course great, and you should, but please do not become one of those douchbags only living for themselves. Remember what suffering is like, even though your own now is over, so that you can help some other in a different situation. There are still a lot of people who suffers greatly, with everything from cancer to blindness, that needs attention and solutions. For those people life still is a daily struggle, and they do not yet have cures. I am not saying this to put you down. Go out and enjoy your new freedom and live out you, but you have also gained wisdom of what suffering is like, and should pay it forward for someone else as well. Again, I gain nothing from coming back explaining this in details as I have done over the years, I spend a lot of time on this because I want to help as much as possible.  

I have gained a lot of experience over the years because of this. Explored human behaviour and trying to figure out what makes life work on this planet, and read everything from medicine and psychology, to technology and business + doing well in school. However, my best advice is to seek out solutions as early as possible (Of course, if you are a teenager you might just be insecure, not having chronic blushing), but don’t wait until you are an old person before going for a solution. In that sense, the sooner you go for a real solution, the better!

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