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Update:

Egazil (hyoscyamine):

I quit using this. Side effects worth mentioning was dry mouth. I did not want to use the maximum dosage, because the mouth got more dry the higher dose I took. My entire body also became warmer (And of course I sweated less, which is what the medicine is given out for in the first place). Being warmer wasn´t bad. In fact I think it helped during exercise, the joints felt more flexible, etc. It did not help a lot with either blushing or flushing. When I blushed it maybe didn´t feel that bad, sine I already felt warm, but I don´t think it did much other than that. 

 

Atenolol (Beta Blocker):

I have started with a low dose of this. I have already seen great results in terms of solving blushing. I had a "high pressured" meeting type of situation, and I don´t think I blushed once. If I did, it was very minor. Usually in these situations I would blush quickly, and my face would remain hot and flushed throughout the entire situation. The side effects I have got is fatigue, decreased physical performance and cold hands and feet. All side effects were expected, and I believe you always get these. The bad thing is that Atenolol do not last for the entire day, but has a half life of 6-9 hours, so you would have to take an other dose in the afternoon. It seems to me that they do not make a lot of slow/extended release versions of beta blockers any more. 

 

The future:

I feel like I am coming close to what will be my final "mix of medicines/drugs" to be taken everyday. I will definitely use a beta blocker, and it will probably be Atenolol. I might increase to a higher dose. I have to way the effect with the side effects. An alternative is adding an antidepressant, with the lowest possible dose (Instead of a high dose of a beta blocker). Also, I wonder if adding a stimulant can help with the fatigue of beta blocker (without it blocking the positive effect the beta blocker has in reducing blushing). To sum up: I will use Atenolol, and maybe add a low dose of antidepressants for curing blushing. And if possible, maybe adding a stimulant to counteract the fatigue from beta blockers. 

A problem that I have is that doctors know so little about blushing, flushing and KPRF, let along using drugs/medicines in curing this. I therefor feel like I have to research this a lot on my own, and almost convince doctors that this helps (Since you need a prescription to get these medicines/drugs). Recently I got a new doctor because the previous moved away, and I had to explain the problem all over again. My experience is that doctors view medicines/drugs differently, and someone is totally ok with it, others have a very restricted view and want to prescribe as little as possible. When you have tried everything else, know this is a physical problem that can be solved with medicines, having to deal with doctors who do not understand the severity of this problem is just an extra factor of frustration. If you ever find yourself to be in a situation where you think a drug/medicine can help you, but the doctor do not want to help, I suppose the only thing you can do is find an other doctor. Anyone who has had a problem with this? 

I must say, having the ETS/ESB-surgery is starting to look tempting. Just to go in to a hospital, be done with this problem the same day and having it gone for the rest of your life, would be so great! Especially since it seems that I can not find drugs that you can take in the morning, and having it last for the entire day. Making sure that you take drugs twice a day, every single day, is certainly not ideal. The reason why I am stilling trying this out is because blushing isn´t guaranteed to disappear from the surgery, but side effects are basically guaranteed and they are also permanent. Also, I view taking drugs as a temporary solution as I believe (and strongly hope!) that better solutions will be found in the future. 

 

Hope everyone is doing well, and are finding the best solutions possible for themselves to this horrible condition! Let´s keep searching and pushing for solutions, and post it in the forum! Cheers :) 

 

 

I'm thinking about atenolol and propranorol but im always stepping myself away because of the side effects they have, exactly what you mention about atenolol.
At this point i just have hope that something will come out of nothing, some researcher will make a difference.
Anyway blushingman im curious to see your outcome in this. keep us informed. Regards 

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Hello all! Ive just read through all of the comments on this thread and of course know how you feel. I just wanted to share my story cause I dont have anyone to talk to about this, and its good to air my thoughts, even though I dont have any solutions to tell about. I am 24 yo and  was born with red cheeks, but at the age of 14 I got a comment or a rather a question from my then best friend, asking me why I always was red in the cheeks. After that I got more aware and it has been now 10 years of tears, pain and suicidal thoughts. At the age of 18-20, I got the nerve and my own money to actually seek help to a doctor. Of course he didn't have a clue to what I had and gave me a cream for curing zits.. It obviously didn't work and I went to like four different doctors with no help whatsoever. I eventually got enough money to invest in laser treatments. I remember being so happy cause I believed it would cure my redness finally, lol. I believe I took 2 sessions with the N-yag laser or maybe some different laser, can't remember as it is some years ago, but it didn't help me and the lady who did the laser treatment didn't want me to waste anymore money. 1 year went on and I got another laser treatment, but with another company and different laser. I think it was with V beam, but not totally sure. I got burnt real bad and I got lots of dots on my face. It looked awful and I remember taking a taxi home cause I didn't want people to see me on the bus. I got so scared after that, so I took a break and just wore makeup for a long time. 2 years passed and I tried laser once more. Different company and I believe different laser. Maybe IPL or maybe I tried V beam, again I dont remember honestly. Tried 3 sessions before calling quits. It got to expensive and I was tired of going through this all over again. Been over 2 years now since I took laser and I THINK I have reduced the redness a little, but I still am quite red all the time and I flush easily. To be honest, I wasnt super carefull after the laser treatments. I dont think I ever wore sunscreen for 6 weeks like I were advised to or avoided stress etc, but I dont think it would have made any difference. I never took medicine and the Efexor medicine that you guys mentioned sounds promising. Is it available in Europe? Specifically in Scandinavia? I remember asking a surgeon a few years ago if ETS would work for me, but he then said No, and I never bother to check about it again. But if it has worked for you guys then I might consider it again. Now a days I just try to cope with the problem as best as I can, but its not easy like you guys know. Especially if you are involved with somebody who just doesnt understand any of it. Hope we will get a cure in the future! Sorry for my long post. I look forward to future oppdates.

Edited by KeepGoing

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Do you suffer from blushing? Or is it flushing? Or is it both. There's quite a difference.

For flushing I would recommend clonidine, it's quite effective for people with constant red cheeks who flush easily. 

Look it up with regards flushing as there are some good success stories, I myself have had good experiences with it regarding facial flushing

 

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Hello, thought I'd share some of my FB experiences as reading through some of your experiences it seems everyone has different situations in which they suffer from FB but also there seems to be differences in how long and frequent people suffer from FB.

So, I break my down FB into what I call different modes -

regular blushing - this is what I can consider to be normal blushing that "normal" people may experience, for me this can be when I'm embarrassed, feel awkward, laugh etc whilst the blushing is more sever than what a normal person may experience it usually goes away quickly and doesn't really bother me too much.

weather blushing - this is simply if my face gets cold, battered by wind and rain. Again whilst this is more severe than what a "normal" person experiences it usually goes away once I'm out of the weather.

intense blushing - this kind of FB is the one that has changed my life, when this happens my cheeks go a deep red, they feel hot and tight, are very warm to the touch, my upper body gets warm to the touch but doesn't go red and worst of all it always lasts for 2-3 hours regardless of where I am or what I'm doing. Almost every day, 99%.

This intense blushing is very strange as when and why it happens, it seems to be varied and contradictory but I'll do the best to explain.

It can be caused by prolonged social situations (the more awkward or more involving of me they are the more chance I'll slip into this intense blushing) even if I'm laughing and joking and having a good time I'll still slip into intense blushing mode. There does seem to be some psychological part in when and why this happens, for example let's say I'm at work (I work in retail) I can be on the shop floor chatting with customers and co-workers and I can be very outgoing and confident and not suffer from this intense blushing. However when I go on my lunch and sit in the staff room for an our eating my food and reading or watching my kindle my intense blushing usually starts up ( over past 6 years this is the most common scenario for it to happen) I then go back to work and I'm a shell of my former self as I'm bright red for no reason and everyone can see it.

Another example, whilst I can be confident on the shop floor if I know I'm not in intense blushing mode but if I have to have a meeting longer than 10 minutes or do paper work with another co-worker my intense blushing will likely start up even if there's minimal to no interaction with the people near me

From what I've said you'd maybe think I have an issue with certain social situations and whilst I do think it is a component it doesn't explain why my intense blushing starts for no reason at all, for example on my lunch at work or I could literally be sat playing video games or making my evening meal and my intense blushing will start. If it's a day off work or by some miracle I don't go into intense blushing at work it will happen in the evening with nothing causing it.

My thoughts on to what is wrong with me, I think there's a psychological aspect here as i worry about certain situations or times of the day and worrying about it can make it worse, but I also know it's likely going to happen no matter what. I believe there is something physically wrong with my body, when I blush it's much more intense than "normal" people and this intense blushing mode. For my face to go extremely red and hot for hours at a time makes no sense especially when you consider it can happen with out any kind of social stimulus or if a social stimulus has ended it continues.

I've not tried any treatment but I've just order some 5HTP and L-Tyrosine.

 

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Hello, thought I'd share some of my FB experiences as reading through some of your experiences it seems everyone has different situations in which they suffer from FB but also there seems to be differences in how long and frequent people suffer from FB.

So, I break my down FB into what I call different modes -

regular blushing - this is what I can consider to be normal blushing that "normal" people may experience, for me this can be when I'm embarrassed, feel awkward, laugh etc whilst the blushing is more sever than what a normal person may experience it usually goes away quickly and doesn't really bother me too much.

weather blushing - this is simply if my face gets cold, battered by wind and rain. Again whilst this is more severe than what a "normal" person experiences it usually goes away once I'm out of the weather.

intense blushing - this kind of FB is the one that has changed my life, when this happens my cheeks go a deep red, they feel hot and tight, are very warm to the touch, my upper body gets warm to the touch but doesn't go red and worst of all it always lasts for 2-3 hours regardless of where I am or what I'm doing. Almost every day, 99%.

This intense blushing is very strange as when and why it happens, it seems to be varied and contradictory but I'll do the best to explain.

It can be caused by prolonged social situations (the more awkward or more involving of me they are the more chance I'll slip into this intense blushing) even if I'm laughing and joking and having a good time I'll still slip into intense blushing mode. There does seem to be some psychological part in when and why this happens, for example let's say I'm at work (I work in retail) I can be on the shop floor chatting with customers and co-workers and I can be very outgoing and confident and not suffer from this intense blushing. However when I go on my lunch and sit in the staff room for an our eating my food and reading or watching my kindle my intense blushing usually starts up ( over past 6 years this is the most common scenario for it to happen) I then go back to work and I'm a shell of my former self as I'm bright red for no reason and everyone can see it.

Another example, whilst I can be confident on the shop floor if I know I'm not in intense blushing mode but if I have to have a meeting longer than 10 minutes or do paper work with another co-worker my intense blushing will likely start up even if there's minimal to no interaction with the people near me

From what I've said you'd maybe think I have an issue with certain social situations and whilst I do think it is a component it doesn't explain why my intense blushing starts for no reason at all, for example on my lunch at work or I could literally be sat playing video games or making my evening meal and my intense blushing will start. If it's a day off work or by some miracle I don't go into intense blushing at work it will happen in the evening with nothing causing it.

My thoughts on to what is wrong with me, I think there's a psychological aspect here as i worry about certain situations or times of the day and worrying about it can make it worse, but I also know it's likely going to happen no matter what. I believe there is something physically wrong with my body, when I blush it's much more intense than "normal" people and this intense blushing mode. For my face to go extremely red and hot for hours at a time makes no sense especially when you consider it can happen with out any kind of social stimulus or if a social stimulus has ended it continues.

I've not tried any treatment but I've just order some 5HTP and L-Tyrosine.

 

you just described the exact same symptoms as me. Mine started a lot earlier in life though, I was 7 years old when I had my first blush giving a speech at school. The intense blushing that can last hours didn't start till I was about 16, I remember it started at school at around 2pm I would randomly get perfect little red circles on my cheeks and I wasn't due to nerves it felt like it was simply the way the air felt in the afternoon. 

Ever since then it just got worse and can happen when I'm super anxious about social situations etc, coming into a heated room after being cold outside etc etc. 

the evening/late afternoon is when it's mostly likely to occur but it can still happen anytime, even when I'm on my own with no anxious thoughts about something nerve racking about to happen. 

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Hello, thought I'd share some of my FB experiences as reading through some of your experiences it seems everyone has different situations in which they suffer from FB but also there seems to be differences in how long and frequent people suffer from FB.

So, I break my down FB into what I call different modes -

regular blushing - this is what I can consider to be normal blushing that "normal" people may experience, for me this can be when I'm embarrassed, feel awkward, laugh etc whilst the blushing is more sever than what a normal person may experience it usually goes away quickly and doesn't really bother me too much.

weather blushing - this is simply if my face gets cold, battered by wind and rain. Again whilst this is more severe than what a "normal" person experiences it usually goes away once I'm out of the weather.

intense blushing - this kind of FB is the one that has changed my life, when this happens my cheeks go a deep red, they feel hot and tight, are very warm to the touch, my upper body gets warm to the touch but doesn't go red and worst of all it always lasts for 2-3 hours regardless of where I am or what I'm doing. Almost every day, 99%.

This intense blushing is very strange as when and why it happens, it seems to be varied and contradictory but I'll do the best to explain.

It can be caused by prolonged social situations (the more awkward or more involving of me they are the more chance I'll slip into this intense blushing) even if I'm laughing and joking and having a good time I'll still slip into intense blushing mode. There does seem to be some psychological part in when and why this happens, for example let's say I'm at work (I work in retail) I can be on the shop floor chatting with customers and co-workers and I can be very outgoing and confident and not suffer from this intense blushing. However when I go on my lunch and sit in the staff room for an our eating my food and reading or watching my kindle my intense blushing usually starts up ( over past 6 years this is the most common scenario for it to happen) I then go back to work and I'm a shell of my former self as I'm bright red for no reason and everyone can see it.

Another example, whilst I can be confident on the shop floor if I know I'm not in intense blushing mode but if I have to have a meeting longer than 10 minutes or do paper work with another co-worker my intense blushing will likely start up even if there's minimal to no interaction with the people near me

From what I've said you'd maybe think I have an issue with certain social situations and whilst I do think it is a component it doesn't explain why my intense blushing starts for no reason at all, for example on my lunch at work or I could literally be sat playing video games or making my evening meal and my intense blushing will start. If it's a day off work or by some miracle I don't go into intense blushing at work it will happen in the evening with nothing causing it.

My thoughts on to what is wrong with me, I think there's a psychological aspect here as i worry about certain situations or times of the day and worrying about it can make it worse, but I also know it's likely going to happen no matter what. I believe there is something physically wrong with my body, when I blush it's much more intense than "normal" people and this intense blushing mode. For my face to go extremely red and hot for hours at a time makes no sense especially when you consider it can happen with out any kind of social stimulus or if a social stimulus has ended it continues.

I've not tried any treatment but I've just order some 5HTP and L-Tyrosine.

 

You've managed to explain perfectly the symptoms that I have been having now for quite some time. I have been struggling so hard to accurately describe what has been going on as it can be so confusing and unpredictable at times leading me to doubt my own theories.

I am intrigued to know more about what you go through to see if we can find any more similarities.

I too experience the different stages but sometimes it is worse than other times so it's hard to say which factor is responsible for this.

What I can say though is that the intense blushing always occurs in the evening. I might go temporarily rosy during the day but it subsides quickly and is not at all the same as the evening flush.

The evening flush starts off slowly with me feeling the heat starting to penetrate my face from within (a tingle in the cheeks). This can occur just as you said... with me sitting there doing absolutely nothing.

As it progresses, my head starts to feel pressurised and I experience a slight headache in the crown region of my head and a congested feeling in my ears, with the feeling of blood rushing to my head. Sometimes I even go light-headed and dizzy. I can also get slightly shaky in the hands and feel a little anxious and on edge, however, I am not sure whether this is being caused by the flush or if it is to do with something like adrenaline being released causing the flush.

The intense flush eventually dissipates sometimes leaving me with a slight residual headache but the redness will usually subside back to the slight but noticeable baseline redness.

A few hours after this evening flush has passed is when my face will be at its best and I will generally feel quite calm and evenly heated throughout my body.

This intense flushing  seems to happen every evening no matter if I'm out with people or inside doing nothing. It seems strange to me that it happens at a very specific time for me and many others.

This observation has led me down the hormone research path as it is for me the most logical explanation as to why the condition presents itself most strongly at a specific time and at a specific age period.

For me, the feeling is that something builds up throughout the day and is released quickly and intensely almost as if a switch had been flicked.

A couple of things that I also seem to have problems with that maybe somebody on here can relate to is that I tend to struggle to maintain my body temperature. My hands and feet can be very cold and I usually feel cold most of the time, even in warm weather, unless I am experiencing an evening flush in which case, I feel uncomfortably hot. Maybe this is a circulation issue that contributes to KPRF or it may be a separate issue, I'm not sure. It's also very very hard for me to put weight on.

I also tend to suffer with fungal issues from time to time such as seborrheic dermatitis and general oily skin. Again, not sure if this is related or a separate issue.

I have tried all sorts of vitamins, diets, drugs, and techniques but nothing has given me a convincing improvement. I have read in multiple places that KPRF is self-limiting and will eventually fade as you age (another factor that leads me to believe the condition may be hormone related). You don't usually see KPRF on older adults which gives me hope that it will one day just resolve itself at least to a more manageable state but I can't bring myself to just sit around and hope that it will go away especially when you are reminded by it every evening.

Types of foods was a hard one to eliminate as a main causative factor for me as I thought certain foods may be exacerbating the redness. Eating specific foods, that I initially thought may be causing a problem, earlier on in the day resulted in no reaction so I concluded that the food couldn't be the culprit if it didn't elicit a reaction shortly after consuming it. The evening flush still happened even after abstaining from the food that I was testing at the time. Saying that though, the ingestion of a big meal during the evening can exacerbate the evening flush further (not cause it) which I assume is an indicator of some sort...

Let me know if any of you guys are experiencing something similar. I have spent an inordinate amount of time researching this affliction and don't usually post on the forums but it is fairly obvious that our collaboration is our best bet of figuring out this frustrating condition.

Stay positive guys!

JJ

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Hi JimmyJon, 

Since you get red in the evening without social interactions, it sounds to me that you have a flushing problem, not a blushing problem. 

Regarding KPRF fading as you get older, you could not be more wrong. This is a genetic disease/skin condition that you are born with and have for your entire life. If anything, it gets worse with age. I have seen people just being slightly red, but as they hit their 50's or 60's, and the skin gets older, the redness gets darker as well. This has happened with every person I have noticed having KPRF, and at best, it did not get worse when they got older. If you want to have a look at a person with KPRF, you can see pictures of the celebrity salesman Brian Tracy. When he was young he barely had any visible redness: http://www.whatson.co.za/uploads/img166938.jpg, but now he has a constant darker redness: http://www.canadianwealthmasters.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/20160402_140040.jpg.

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You've managed to explain perfectly the symptoms that I have been having now for quite some time. I have been struggling so hard to accurately describe what has been going on as it can be so confusing and unpredictable at times leading me to doubt my own theories.

I am intrigued to know more about what you go through to see if we can find any more similarities.

I too experience the different stages but sometimes it is worse than other times so it's hard to say which factor is responsible for this.

What I can say though is that the intense blushing always occurs in the evening. I might go temporarily rosy during the day but it subsides quickly and is not at all the same as the evening flush.

The evening flush starts off slowly with me feeling the heat starting to penetrate my face from within (a tingle in the cheeks). This can occur just as you said... with me sitting there doing absolutely nothing.

As it progresses, my head starts to feel pressurised and I experience a slight headache in the crown region of my head and a congested feeling in my ears, with the feeling of blood rushing to my head. Sometimes I even go light-headed and dizzy. I can also get slightly shaky in the hands and feel a little anxious and on edge, however, I am not sure whether this is being caused by the flush or if it is to do with something like adrenaline being released causing the flush.

The intense flush eventually dissipates sometimes leaving me with a slight residual headache but the redness will usually subside back to the slight but noticeable baseline redness.

A few hours after this evening flush has passed is when my face will be at its best and I will generally feel quite calm and evenly heated throughout my body.

This intense flushing  seems to happen every evening no matter if I'm out with people or inside doing nothing. It seems strange to me that it happens at a very specific time for me and many others.

This observation has led me down the hormone research path as it is for me the most logical explanation as to why the condition presents itself most strongly at a specific time and at a specific age period.

For me, the feeling is that something builds up throughout the day and is released quickly and intensely almost as if a switch had been flicked.

A couple of things that I also seem to have problems with that maybe somebody on here can relate to is that I tend to struggle to maintain my body temperature. My hands and feet can be very cold and I usually feel cold most of the time, even in warm weather, unless I am experiencing an evening flush in which case, I feel uncomfortably hot. Maybe this is a circulation issue that contributes to KPRF or it may be a separate issue, I'm not sure. It's also very very hard for me to put weight on.

I also tend to suffer with fungal issues from time to time such as seborrheic dermatitis and general oily skin. Again, not sure if this is related or a separate issue.

I have tried all sorts of vitamins, diets, drugs, and techniques but nothing has given me a convincing improvement. I have read in multiple places that KPRF is self-limiting and will eventually fade as you age (another factor that leads me to believe the condition may be hormone related). You don't usually see KPRF on older adults which gives me hope that it will one day just resolve itself at least to a more manageable state but I can't bring myself to just sit around and hope that it will go away especially when you are reminded by it every evening.

Types of foods was a hard one to eliminate as a main causative factor for me as I thought certain foods may be exacerbating the redness. Eating specific foods, that I initially thought may be causing a problem, earlier on in the day resulted in no reaction so I concluded that the food couldn't be the culprit if it didn't elicit a reaction shortly after consuming it. The evening flush still happened even after abstaining from the food that I was testing at the time. Saying that though, the ingestion of a big meal during the evening can exacerbate the evening flush further (not cause it) which I assume is an indicator of some sort...

Let me know if any of you guys are experiencing something similar. I have spent an inordinate amount of time researching this affliction and don't usually post on the forums but it is fairly obvious that our collaboration is our best bet of figuring out this frustrating condition.

Stay positive guys!

JJ

Mine also only happens in the afternoon/evening, for example today had good day at work then with 15 minutes to go boom! Intense flushing for few hours. 

If I'm off work it will almost always be in the evening. I agree it definitely feels like my body just flips a switch fills my face with blood then it's a few hours wait for it to stop.

It's strange how I can have a quick blush and it goes away and is less intense in colour but then I can have this intense blush untriggered were I go very red and it takes hours to go away. Something must be causing my body to do this.

It's especially frustrating as in the mornings I'm usually quite pale and the contrast with me in my intense blush/flush is staggering. I'll likely post some pics of myself soon showing the difference.

 

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Hello! I also have KPRF, flushing all time (by the evening it intensifies, and in the morning there is almost no redness) and also my cheeks are red when weather is cold. Is this symptom of KPRF or something different?

Now I am taking 5-HTP for 5 days, 100 mg once a day, and hope this helps.

Edited by dexedrine

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Is 5-HTP really effective for flushing? I've been taking it for a month, but redness is only 10% less...

5-HTP is just a natural supplement, and not as strong as actual medication. I believe som have found it helpful reducing blushing, but not sure if it could reduce flushing. Since flushing is your main concern I would look into clonidine or an SSRI/SNRI like Effexor. 

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Hi redzio :) 
I would start with 50 mg and see the effect you get from that. If it does not work as much as you want, you can increase to 75 mg or 100 mg. Then you should notice a decrease in blushing for sure. The full effect starts after about an hour, and lasts about 5-6 hours (with declining effect after that). You can take it as needed or daily. If you want the effect for a day, you have to take it twice a day.
One problem can occure if you need 100 mg for stopping blushing, and you want the effect for a full day. That would mean you need 150-200 mg (Divided in two doses - To keep about 100 mg in the body for a day). The normal maximum dosage for most conditions is 100 mg, but I have however seen 200 mg being prescribed for some conditions, so it should not be dangerous. Of course you have to talk to your physician about this, and also decide how strong side effects you are willing to have (As they increase as the dose increases). I have not myself tried any more than 100 mg/day. 

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Why facial flushing is more stronger in the evening? I also remembered my experience of smoking marijuana and using psilocybin, so my cheeks were very hot and red for all time of the trip. May be, because of serotonin releasing? I think we need to understand how serotonin affects skin and flushing/redness.

Also, what do you think about Vbeam (If cheeks is not very red, I read post blushingman about 20-25% reduce of redness, but may be anyone else had experience of vbeam) ?

Edited by dexedrine

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If you have KPRF you need to do this right now. Reduce all sugar intake, especially white refined sugar. No more sugar in your coffee, limit Candy intake. 

Okay so I read on here that PDL (Vbeam) treatment didn't work for some! You need to revisit this treatment because it has the best possible outcome for anyone with KPRF.

http://www.mdedge.com/edermatologynews/article/77033/aesthetic-dermatology/pulsed-dye-laser-targets-keratosis-pilaris

It's not going to work for everyone but it should for most. Your dermatologist needs to tweak the settings on the laser just right for you. You should see bruising for 10-20 days after your treatment. Yes he needs to over treat it kinda 'burn' you. Basically killing the blood capillaries. The body will eventually absorb them & your skin will return to normal with less redness. Talk to your doctors again about PDL treatment. Do test spots with different settings of the laser on your cheek before you commit to a full face session. I'll post more information later.

 

Edited by Super

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Update: Drugs, surgery, prospects of the future and more

Hi everyone! It has been some time since I have made an update. I have tried some new things, read even more and I also have not responded to everyone. This update will therefor be quite long (I probably have to put it out as several posts), but I think it will give value to people who are interested in this.

 

1. Afrin Nasal Spray

I tried this, but it did nothing for me.

 

2. Botox

I have recently tried out this, as there are some studies suggesting this could help. Unfortunately it did nothing for me, with neither blushing or flushing.

 

3. Medication

I don’t have too much new information to add here. I think a combination of a small/medium dose of SSRI/SNRI + a small/medium dose of a beta blocker is the best way to go. It is not at all addictive or dangerous to use long term. And you can change or stop as you wish, until you find what is best for you.

Regarding SSRI/SNRI I think you have to try out several types, since people respond different to different brands.

Regarding beta blockers, both Atenolol and Propranolol works for me, and Atenolol has the least side effects. Unfortunately neither works for an entire day (Atenolol needs to be taken at least twice a day and Propranolol at least 3 times a day). I have heard of some beta blockers that is suppose to last for an entire day, like Nadolol (Corgard), but it is my understanding that it is not common to use this for blushing. I have not been able to try this out myself, so I don’t know if it would work or not.

 

4. Lasers

I see someone asking about this. I have now had about 12 laser treatments, with the best and newest of lasers (Both Vbeam and Cutera Excel V), using the highest intensity they offer. It really does not work, and I have not talked to a single person that is satisfied with their result from lasers. At best you get a slight reduction of redness and heat of the face, but that’s it (In no way do you eliminate permanent redness, flushing or blushing).

 

I have also visited 5 different dermatologists, and talked to even more online, to get different opinions. They all basically say the same. That KPRF, Rosacea, flushing and blushing have been studied very little, so they don’t know much about it, and that laser treatments is the newest and best solution available for killing veins in the face. Here is the thing, it may very well be the best thing available, but that does not do any good when the “best” thing available does not work at all. And the bad part is that many dermatologists market this as giving excellent result, almost praising it as being the greatest invention since fire, and showing great before and after picture. This is complete fake, and so easy to manipulate. They often show the same pictures, with patients they have not treated themselves. Also, the “before picture” may be taken right after a laser treatment, when the skin is completely flushed. When they the next time take a picture, the skin is of course less red, but this should not be credited the laser treatment. This is just a normal not-flushed vs flushed type of scenario, and has nothing to do with laser results. Also, since the body always produce new skin cells, even if the lasers would work, you still would have to keep having lasers your entire life, since you are not dealing with the underlying cause of the red skin (Just trying to reduce it superficially). Summation; lasers are not the miracle cure dermatologists market it to be.  

 

5. Surgery

I have read everything I have been able to find about the surgery for blushing, both forums (people who have had it done), what surgeons say and other medical rapports. It can be of great help for blushers, but on the other hand it is very controversial and can cause severe side effects. From all the information I have gathered, here are my thoughts:

 

The most important thing for me if I went through with the surgery is:

       -       Only operating at the T2-level.

o   This is because studies show this to be the nerve ganglia that most of the times are responsible for blushing. Also, the less nerves you operate on, the less risk there are of getting severe side effects.

       -       Using clamps (not cut or burn). The so called ESB or ETS-C surgery.

o    I do not consider the surgery to be reversible, but if I got major side effects, they might be reduced somewhat if I got the clamps removed. Also, by not burning, you do not have the possibility of the heat destroying other nerves around the T2-level.

       -       Going to a very experienced surgeon.

 

Side effects to be expected (Basically guaranteed):

      -       Drier hands and face.

o   But hopefully that it is not bothersome thanks to lotions.

      -       Sweating very little, or not at all, over the nipple line.

      -       Sweating more below the nipple line (Compensatory Sweating - CS).

o   Hopefully to a degree that is not bothersome in the day to day life, but that you sweat more for instance during exercise and in extreme heat.

      -       Reduced heart rate

      -       Reduced physical ability

o   Hopefully only to a small degree. Like you will not have the extra competitive edge that professional athletes need, but you will be able to work out at a high level.

 

Side effects not to be expected:

       -       Horner’s syndrome.

o   This is almost impossible to get with today’s methods. Using clamps, even if you clamped the nerve responsible for the eye lid muscle, you would immediately notice it and just move the clips further down.

 

Side effects that I have read people getting, but that I consider to be unfortunate:

       -       Severe CS

       -       Feeling constantly tired, and also not being able to concentrate or work out hard

       -       Being constantly, or more often, flushed and warm in the face.

       -       Gustatory sweating

       -       Being either very cold or very hot, and not being able to feel good because of this (Having the “natural thermostat” broken)

       -       Super dryness over the nipple line, like very dry eyes, scalp, etc.

       -       Wrinkles and premature aging of the face.

 

Also, it actually is not a guarantee that the surgery will stop blushing completely, though statistically it is a great chance that it will (Around 85 % of the times in several studies, and down to 46 % per cent when long term success rates were studied). There are also studies showing that the surgery does not work well for slow increasing flushing/blushing, like when you give a presentation and remaining in a stressful situation. That it only work well for that “quick appearing blushing”, like being caught off guard.

 

Other thoughts:

     -       The medicine that worked the best for me was the beta blockers. A beta blocker works by calming down the "fight and flight" response of the nervous system. This is the same part you operate on when having surgery. This might indicate that the surgery will be successful. This is not a study, just a thought I had.

     -       The surgery is extremely controversial. In Sweden, where they first started with the surgery and where they have operated over 3000 people, it now is illegal. This is because they have seen the consequence people have long term. When you decide to make a surgery illegal, after having that many surgeries done, it is not without reason. Also, there are not many surgeries who has their own websites dedicated to warn people about it (Which the ETS/ESB surgery has). Again, this is not without reason, and shows the seriousness of the possible side effects. 

    -       Some private surgeons market this to do more than what it actually does. I think everyone who have read forums like this know that the surgery is not intended for flushing, only blushing (This also surgeons, who particularly work in countries with free health care, and don’t personally gain from people having the surgery, will tell you). But this girl; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CUoDzb1fER4&t=2s, had a flushing problem and went to Dr. David Nielson. As she explained, she was told that the surgery would be perfect for her, but now that she has had it done she realizes it has done nothing for her. This is very sad. Everyone who have read about the surgery knows it is not meant for flushing, and there is no way a surgeon who have done many surgeries wouldn’t know that. This shows that some surgeons care more about making money, than providing the most value for their patients, and people should be aware of that.

    -       The video above also proves that increased redness of the skin is not caused (only or not at all) by an overactive nervous system (Her nervous system is now destroyed, and the flushing is the same). When you blush your nervous system definitely gets activated, which is why the surgery can help. But I feel like surgeons at one point said, “the sympathetic system starts the blushing, so let’s just burn of the nerves and that will cure the problem”. History has shown that this is not the all time cure some surgeons make it out to be. Increased redness has to do with genes, having more capillaries than others, skin prone to reddening, and probably because of factors we do not yet know (Like maybe hormones or something completely different?). 

    -       There are 2 things I miss the most, that I not have been pursuing because of blushing, and that is getting a girlfriend and going for the career I want. If I went for the surgery it would be because I expected to be able to go for these things afterwards. When I then read about for instance @Filur explaining how he could not cuddle with his girlfriend after the surgery because of CS, and that other people still had increasing blushing in situations like meetings and presentations, this to me makes the surgery less attractive to consider (And even more of a gamble). 

 

6. An other proof that this is a physical, not psychological, problem:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gSw-0UuCpNQ

A video of a minister in Australia, Barnaby Joyce, who blushes on live television. As you can see in the video, he also has KPRF. The video also shows what it looks like having constant red cheeks, and how you easily therefor also have chronic blushing (And the face, but particularly the cheeks, get more red). It is particularly 2 things I take from the video: First of all I get really proud whenever I see someone with a condition you can do nothing about, who despite that go out and do their best. Second, it shows that this is not something you just go to therapy to get rid of. I don’t think this man has a problem with his confidence, it simply is that when you have chronic blushing you are going to get red when you feel strong emotions. That is how you are built. As he says himself; “I am always blushing, it is a problem”. If someone reads this, who don’t have chronic blushing yourself, I will shortly try to explain why it is bothersome: Imagine having a sign at your face everyday for your life, that can start to blink and when it happens you feel and intense heat of the face. Also, when it blinks it is socially perceived that you are embarrassed, are hiding something, are shameful or have low self esteem. Most people might just have a “big blink” once every 6 month, when they get really embarrassed. And other people can get really embarrassed, without the sign blinking at all. When you have chronic blushing however the sign starts to blink every day, just simply by feeling strong emotions. And you have no control over it.

I am not saying you can’t have psychological problems as well, you absolutely can. But you don’t blush because you have a psychological problem, you get psychological problems because you blush all the time and there is nothing you can do about it. Because how should you react? It happens when you feel something, and being in social situations. And particularly in situations when you need to keep your head cool, like asking someone on a date, giving a presentation, or just having a simple discussion. Should you just laugh about yourself every time it happens (Like Barnaby in the video), even though it is not funny, you just can’t help it? Hide from the world? Of course you can try not to care about it, but it is not that easy when you everyday have a face that lights up, you feel the heat and you immediately see a reaction of aversion in the people around, and you constantly send out signals that something is wrong.

 

7. Illegal drugs

I read on this forum someone talking about using mushrooms or marijuana for solving this. So I thought I should comment, but this is my first and last time commenting on this. The reason for this is that I have absolutely no experience of this. The second reason is that I personally think this would be going in the wrong direction. I absolutely have no judgement over the people turning to this, and I understand completely the frustration of not finding good solutions and wanting to try everything. But I think using for instance prescription drugs in cooperation with your doctor will be more effective and also a lot safer.  

 

8. Future Prospect – Gene Technology

Gene technology is actually no longer science fiction. Thanks to a newly developed method called CRISPR Cas9, it has become easy for any biologist to use gene technology (For a quick introduction video, check this out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jAhjPd4uNFY). The main key is that it is possible to identify the exact part of the gene that causes an illness that is unwanted, like blindness, cancer, and illnesses that are relevant for people on this forum, KPRF, Rosacea, excessive sweating, blushing, etc. It is possible to remove the exact gene that are responsible for these illnesses, without hurting anything else! Imagine that, these illnesses have no benefit what so ever, and now it can be possible to get rid of them!

 

Believe it or not, there are people who are against using this new technology in medicine. For our part, curing conditions like KPRF and blushing, there are two main challenges that need to be overcome. These are:

     1.      Not letting ignorant politicians and other negative people winning the debate regarding this technology.

     2.     Raising enough money specifically for finding a cure for blushing, flushing, KPRF, Rosacea, etc. As with everything else, money is what decides where the focus will be on.

 

Other arguments in favor of finding a solution for these problems:

      -       Even though these problems (KPRF, blushing, Rosacea, excessive sweating, etc.) are researched way too little, they are identified in the medical world as serious problems. Otherwise dermatologists would not use laser treatments for this, and surgeons would not carry out surgery for this (They even give the ETS surgery out for free in countries with free health care and it is covered by insurance in other countries, simply because this is recognized for what it is: a serious problem, not a cosmetic one). Hot flashes for women during menopause is recognized as a problem, that they are trying to cure. It is basically the same as flushing and blushing that the people of this forum is prone to, except they are lucky only to get this for a short period, whereas we have the heat and redness daily for our entire life.

      -       An other point proving that this is not a cosmetic surgery is because of the suicides that have occurred due to the severity of the problem, combined with the lack of good solutions. Also, the fact that there are thousands of people who have had the ETS-surgery done, despite knowing what kind of side effects they can get, shows how serious this really is. If the problem just were of a cosmetic degree, there would not be a single person risking the outcomes of this surgery.

 

One of the main arguments from critics (which are mostly super religious people) is basically that humans are the way they are for are reason, and that it is wrong to change this. I am baffled by this kind of argumentation. In my opinion, if you are going to be against medical progress, then you have to be against everything about the profession of medicine. If you believe it is God’s plan everything that happens, then you would have to stop doctors from existing, stop giving vaccines and have people die of diseases like tuberculosis and measles (Which people died of in the millions before, but thanks to research we have found solutions, and this basically no longer exists). Take KPRF, this is constant redness of cheeks (which makes blushing and flushing major problems) + bumps on the skin (Particularly on shoulders and upper-arms, which can itch a lot). Flushing and itching also get worse in certain weathers and when eating certain foods. Same with Rosacea. The redness and skin irritations is a little bit different, but the concept and the triggers are the same as with KPRF. Having these conditions does not serve either the people who has it or humanity in general anything at all. It is nothing but pain! Finding the gene responsible for KPRF and Rosacea, you could simply just remove it. Just being rid of the redness, and not having to have ETS-surgery or use meds that can destroy your health (Being rid of the exact problem, not having to get any negative side effects). Sorry for writing to this extent, but I wanted to make sure that my points came across, and that it is clear what the debate is really about. A part of the debate is that we should find out if this is a safe procedure, both now and for the future. This part of the debate I fully support, and we definitely should make sure that it is safe to use this. But another part of the debate is that some people say that it is wrong to progress with this, simply because they feel it is wrong to do something with the genes. I mean, just imagine finding the gene responsible for blindness, meaning that we have the possibility to get rid of blindness in humans forever. And then telling a blind person that we have a completely safe method in curing her, but that we feel that it is wrong and therefore we will not allow it. This is the part of the debate that I find utterly insane. If it proves to be completely safe (which it seems to be), but not using this technology just because some people do not want to do something with a small part of the genes, in my opinion is as wrong as it could get.

 

9. Other thoughts regarding the future

If the only options that ever would be available are the once we have today (Which basically is either surgery or medications), I probably would just go with the surgery. For now, medications do work somewhat, and hopefully we will see better solutions in the future, so I am not going for surgery just yet.

I must say I am totally disgusted of how few options people with this problem are faced with. No matter what you choose it involves hurting part of your health, and you just have to hope that the side effects is not as bad as the original problem. Having tried basically every possible solution there is, talked to a bunch of surgeons and dermatologists and read all I have been able to find online: The true conclusion is without a doubt that the medical field knows way too little about this (Both Chronic blushing, flushing, KPRF and Rosacea), and better solutions need to come.

A problem with medicine today is that they value survival, compared to valuing having a great quality of life. For me at least, the meaning of life is living your life to the fullest and expressing all that you are to the world, not just try to survive for as long as possible. When you are not able to be yourself every day in your life, while simultaneously not seeing any chance of a solution, that is what causes depression. Even if you manage to achieve certain things, without fulfillment, that really is failure. I know for my part at least I would gladly live 50 years without this problem, instead of 150 years with this problem.

A second problem is that the doctors, politicians and other people who might be against the progress of curing illnesses, have not had to deal with this themselves. They might understand that it is bothersome having a problem, but they can not comprehend what it is like living with a problem that affects every part of both the social and professional life.

Thankfully there are people (dermatologists, plastic surgeons, institutions, etc.) that do have a focus of increasing the quality of life for people. I don’t have the delusion that gene technology is the absolute answer to this. It could prove not to be safe or not work well, and/or it might be a better or less invasive solution to this. I see for instance a couple of people have posted new studies being done in finding solutions to menopausal hot flashes. To me it is kind of ironic that hot flashes are being treated so seriously, and doctors do everything they can to treat this. But people with chronic blushing or flushing, who have the same symptoms their entire life (not having to endure this only during a short period -menopause), are being told to seek out cognitive behavioral therapy to learn to just accept it. This is crazy. If a doctor can comprehend that it is bothersome to flush during menopause, they should be able to recognize it for people with a skin condition who has this every day, their entire life. But anyway, the good news is that research for hot flashes might benefit chronic blushers and flushers somewhat also. 

Also, the combination of how many people that struggles with this + the few and terrible options available, would make the person responsible for providing better solutions a very rich person. That is a good incentive for organizations and people to invest in finding better solutions.

 

10. How to have new treatments available

As I see it, there 4 ways of making this happen:

 1. Creating awareness in the medical field about how substantial this problem is

 2. Supporting new technology – being pro when voting, etc.

 3. Supporting projects financially (As this will not be researched unless someone is paying for it)

 4. Becoming a medical professional yourself, and being part of the research

 

As I am not in the medical field myself, I am going to do what I can regarding the first three steps. I hope others find their best way in supporting this.

 

11. YouTube videos and online sites

Even though we should not accept having this condition, and we need to find better solutions, I just wanted to end with some thoughts that has helped me dealing with this condition. I think part of why it becomes such a big problem is because of how misunderstood this problem is. And when you get the courage to talk to your doctor about it, since they often know nothing about it and relate it to their own normal blushing (which is not the same as chronic blushing), they often only say you need therapy. The sites I am linking really has made me care less that I am blushing. Just knowing this is a genetic condition, and that other people who has this feel the same in social situations, I feel makes it easier when for instance meeting a negative doctor (We really know more than many does on this subject). Again, I am not claiming just working on your thought process will stop blushing or not make it bothersome, but perhaps it can make easier to deal with and pushing you to live more. My personal goal anyway is to: Find the best possible solutions available (For me that probably will be medication, but every person must decide for themselves whether it is that too, surgery or something else), and then just deciding that: It is good enough for now to live my life. And if I still should blush from time to time, just thinking it is not the end of the world. Yes it is bothersome, but it does not hurt anyone. If a person feel the need to make a big deal of my blushing, that really is a shallow and negative person, and not a person I want to hang out with or take advice from anyway. Again, I am not trying to underrate the severity of chronic blushing, because that should not be done! Just reflecting on some thoughts that might be healthy to consider. There has been suicides because of this, and it’s been written in the suicide letter how it is because of blushing and that they hope awareness will arise on the matter. I fully get this reasoning. A part of feeling your life has meaning is by contributing and not just living for yourself. When you feel you can not do that alive, at least you can do it by creating awareness when killing yourself. Even though I fully get that reasoning, it is so sad and I hope the world never sees another suicide because of this condition. Something that has given me meaning (That other might copy - just glad if someone does) is: I know what a hell it is having this condition, so I am going to support new solutions to this the best way I can. Of course, the more people working towards new solutions, the quicker new and better solutions will come. But even if I never got to take part of them myself, knowing that the people coming after me would not have to go through the same suffering as myself, would make it all worthwhileAnyway, below is some of the sites/videos that helped me:

 

A guy shares his concrete thought process of how he managed to not care about blushing as much:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tmN1s2-Kxjc&t=185s

 

A girl who talks of the problem in a way I think many can relate. I particularly like the reflection of how much she has lost out on, and that even though it is bothersome, accepting it and moving on, you can stop being stuck and live more:

Video 1:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKkBCmc1AJA

Video 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tO-5aV3ZwtM

 

I just want to send a big thanks to all the people in the videos. They are braver than me, as I don’t think I myself would upload a video talking about my problem like that. But it really is helping people and also spreading awareness, so thank you!

 

The webpage written by the parents of Brandon Thomas (One of the persons who have committed suicide because of this) together with Dr. Enrique Jadresic (A doctor who himself has suffered from chronic blushing and who has written the book; When blushing hurts). It both tries to explain how the problem affects the persons suffering from this and also showing treatment options. Every doctor who has a patient with this should have a look at the website:

http://chronicblushinghelp.com/whatischronicblushing.html

If you who have put the site together read this, thank you!

 

This is the end of the update. I know it is very long, but my goal was to give as much value as I could. I hope many find something that can be useful, so that you can come closer to living your life to the fullest, while we simultaneously work out a solution, without severe side effects, that get rid of this condition once and for all!   

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I've read through this forum and this post with great interest. Only until yesterday was I under the impression that I had rosacea and saw the rough bumps on my skin as a separate problem to my nearly constant facial redness. However, rosacea products rarely work for me and my redness is all over, not just in selected areas (although it is most intense on my cheeks). Now I'm quite sure that I have KPRF.

It first started in my early pre-teen/teenage years, when I was around 11 or 12 I think, and was a source of embarrassment. People would constantly think that I was blushing, stressed, embarrassed, shy, sunburned, secretly in love with whoever I was talking to, etc. I'm female so once I was able to go shopping on my own, I started experimenting with makeup. I'm quite pale but even the palest concealer or foundation would turn orangey due to the underlying redness. I also started wearing sunscreen daily hoping that it was the sun creating my red skin. Daily sunscreen helped even out my skin tone so that the redness didn't appear so blotchy, but didn't get rid of the redness at all. It wasn't until I stumbled upon a green-tinted concealer that I was finally able to get my skin looking like its regular pale shade and was able to get my face to match my body. This has been a true godsend! 

Of course cosmetics are only a temporary and superficial solution. You have to apply it everyday, some lighting exposes the green makeup, and I have to always cover it with other foundation or pressing powder in order to minimize the extra paleness or hide the grayish or greenish glow it can sometimes give off which can look weird and makes my skin look tired and dull.

 

Nevertheless, reading about all the other methods people have tried out (SSRIs, beta blockers, surgery), I'm going to be sticking with this. Why?

1. SSRIs & beta blockers - changing my brain chemistry, the side effects, the possibilities of overdose, having to take a significant amount of time to find the right dosage, and the possible horrible withdrawal symptoms are not worth it to me. I've once had a bad experience with recreational drugs and know what can be at stake so I'm staying far away from these. The withdrawal symptoms from beta blockers can also be horrible so no thanks. I have a job where memory, attention, and physical and mental stamina are important and if I can cover up my redness with makeup which can last the whole day and not just simply 5-6 hours, I will choose that instead.

2. Surgery - I like cuddling in bed so the excessive sweating would be a problem for me. Again, the sweating will be permanent and if I'm lucky, my KPRF might decrease with age. (I doubt it though... I'm not sure if it is genetic because my parents are much more tan than me although my mother's skin can be quite red and my siblings also have red skin every now and then but not as bad as mine and nobody in my immediate family has bumps on their upper arms. I do have a distant cousin who does have bumps on her arms, but she doesn't get a red face.) I'd rather have to put on makeup every day than deal with sweating which will be much more difficult to cover up. Also, I have dry skin in general and already put on hand cream every night before going to sleep. 

Anything that will affect my heart is also off the table. Like I said, I have a demanding job and I don't want to put myself at risk for any problems.

 

I understand everyone's concern, embarrassment, and sadness when it comes to this condition. I hate that I always have to wear makeup and that I can't control it. Some days I will wake up with awesome, amazing skin that matches the rest of my body and then a few hours later, boom, it's all red again! Incredibly frustrating and growing up, I often felt ashamed and had low self-esteem. I would rather not have anyone see me without any makeup on. However, having the option of wearing makeup does make it a lot easier to deal with. I don't know what I'd do without my green primer/concealer! 

Finding out about KPRF has helped me because now I will be able to tell my family and possible partner about why I'm always red if I don't wear makeup. It's a simple skin condition due to an overproduction of keratin and when it comes to my face, it's an inflammatory reaction. 

 

I've recently had a look at my skincare regime and am experimenting with different products. One product that I recently started using and that has affected my redness in a positive way is retinol. Initially I wanted to start using it to prevent aging but was a bit apprehensive because it can cause dryness and irritate the skin - something I normally avoid at all costs. However, this product is amazing. Not only has it gotten rid of lines I didn't even know were "wrinkles", I now wake up with regular tone skin more days than not. Before there'd only be about a 30-50% change that I'd wake up with non-red skin, now it's almost daily. Of course once I start the day and start putting on my other products (moisturizer, SPF, etc.) it goes red again but I'm not going to stop wearing sunscreen and want to put on makeup anyways to deal with the shine sunscreen can give. My skin goes red when I put on the retinol, but in the morning the redness is usually gone and my skin looks great. Smaller pores, less lines, much decreased redness, and fuller skin.

Recently I also found out that products containing AHAs/glycolic acid, citric acid, and salicylic acid can help. I will definitely start trying these out as well and let you guys know if it helped at all. I will also visit a dermatologist soon and find out what they recommend.

 

So for now, this is what I'd recommend instead of drugs and surgery:

1. Green-tinted concealer/foundation/primer
2. Retinol (I use Skinceuticals Retinol 0.3)
3. Tissuing off cleanser instead of other rougher methods
4. Daily sunscreen to prevent any other skin discolorations & sunburn
5. A silk pillowcase - sounds crazy but the ultra smooth texture has really helped in preventing my skin from becoming more aggravated and silk doesn't absorb so much moisture (ie. my moisturizer or retinol cream don't get absorbed by my pillowcase as easily which means they are more effective). Also, silk is cooler than other materials and this colder temperature helps calm down my skin as well.

 

I realise that there are a lot of men on this forum as well who will probably be against wearing any kind of makeup. However, I must say this: unlike most makeup, you aren't wearing this for vanity reasons or to look better than you are. You're wearing it to look like you. Sometimes I wake up with perfect skin and I just want to enjoy that rare moment and not put on makeup and other products that will incite the redness again, but I do so so that when I do go red later on, it will at least be covered and much less noticeable. I want people to see me, my real face, and not be distracted by the redness. I don't go out of my way to cover up blemishes, freckles, and any other skin imperfections as I don't need my skin to look perfect and don't want to set up any "unrealistic expectations". I wear my makeup to look natural and normal and so this is perfect. It has helped me so much. When I'm wearing my green-tinted makeup, I never worry about how my skin looks. Throughout the day it will wear off slightly, but then I don't mind the occasional redness showing through because it looks healthy. I never have to touch up so it's a very durable solution, even when I do sports. I only re-apply powder sometimes to get rid of any shine.

 

Oh, a few last things. When I smoked for a couple of months, I noticed that my skin was a lot less red - especially as the day went on. By the end of the day again, my skin would be perfect once I washed my face. The skin tone would barely go red. This is due to the decreased blood flow. Of course this wasn't healthy and once I quit, I unfortunately had to deal with the "detox" acne and I wouldn't recommend all the risks of smoking just to get rid of redness. I also find that wearing hydrating facial sheet masks also really helps. Of course this is just temporary, but I always enjoy the moments that I get to see my skin for what it really is without the redness. 

 

I hope that my post will help some of you. I know it's not a magical solution or even a solution for the underlying problem at all, but hopefully you'll at least have picked up some ideas of how to cover up or deal with the redness because I know how embarrassing and debilitating it can be. Green concealer. Green primer. Go buy it. Buy it online if you're too embarrassed to go into a store. And try retinol and silk pillowcases. I'm going to be trying other products as well to see if they help and I'll go visit a dermatologist for extra advice and I'll report back, but I'm afraid we're going to just have to deal with it the best way possible. Of course I feel insecure when I wake up next to someone and panic that they'll notice the ruddiness of my skin without makeup, but at least I can tell them that it's just an inflammatory skin reaction and that I wear green-tinted makeup to minimize the way it looks. There are also people with dark, large birth marks or who have burns. In comparison, this is easier to cover up. That's just life. People wear clothes that make them look thinner, dye their hair to look younger, wear bras that give their breasts more support, and go tanning. Wearing a bit of makeup to cover up a skin condition you can do nothing about isn't all that different. Like the other examples it's just a temporary fix and eventually people will see the "real" you, but it's nothing to be ashamed about. 

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Btw, this is the concealer that use: https://www.dm.de/alverde-naturkosmetik-anti-roetung-grundierung-p4010355265111.html. I don't know if it's available for ordering wherever you are, but I can recommend this one. I've also tried other brands such as Clinique's rosacea green primer but I found it to water and ineffective. It gave me too much of a green glow without getting rid of the redness. I really need something thicker and more "makeupy". I just checked out the website where I get my concealer and they have many more anti-red options:

https://www.dm.de/nyx-professional-makeup-concealer-concealer-wand-green-12-p800897123383.html
https://www.dm.de/nyx-professional-makeup-concealer-concealer-jar-green-12-p800897123147.html
https://www.dm.de/essence-cosmetics-abdeckstift-colour-correcting-liquid-concealer-gruen-30-p4251232220124.html
https://www.dm.de/catrice-abdeckstift-camouflage-cream-anti-red-gruen-p4250947598467.html
https://www.dm.de/essence-cosmetics-concealer-colour-correcting-stick-gruen-04-p4251232233346.html
https://www.dm.de/alverde-naturkosmetik-abdeckstift-pure-beauty-anti-roetung-korrekturstift-p4010355261441.html

I haven't tried out any of the others but maybe I will in the future. You'll find many more other options at your local drugstore makeup isle or online. 

I use it by pushing about half a pump onto my hand, then blend it a bit with my fingers and then gently dabbing it on my face followed by some smearing to blend it out. I'll then finish it all off with a little bit off powder that matches my actual skin tone. 

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I want to say, that Ashwagandha+EGCG helps for evening cheeks burning (if you have it). It is not very effective, but can be useful, for example, it helps me (not for redness, unfortunately)

I learned about Ashwagandha from here: https://rosaceagroup.org/The_Rosacea_Forum/showthread.php?34232-KPRF-LRP-1-and-Metalloproteinases

 

Edited by dexedrine

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Thank you for sharing things that have worked for you. 


I agree, lalaland321, that using make up if you are a girl is probably the easiest way to go. It covers it completely, and there are no side effects. Of course it does not cure it and it is bothersome to rely on it every day, so it is still not an acceptable long term solution. With men however, it is not a solution short term either. Of course, if a man wants to do it, that´s fine. But I have tried this myself, and it was not fun. There is absolutely no way it is not visible, so either you have to be upfront about covering your skin condition or pretend that you do it because you like it or something.

Regarding medication, I think you have a bit confused idea of it. First of all, it should not be compared to recreational drugs. That is something completely different. Also, having tried both beta blockers and different SSRI/SNRI, I have not experienced any horrible side effects. Just very mild once, which often decrease over time. Also, SSRI/SNRI is not given just to do something psychologically, but physically as well. That is why they are prescribed for hot flashes. I was myself really surprised when I was on them, and got less flushed during exercise, so it definitely does something in reducing flushing. 

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Blushingman,

I agree with your sentiments wholeheartedly.  That is perhaps the most concise and encompassing assessment of our patient group that I have ever read.

ETS is a monster of a procedure.  It is unfortunate that that is the only permanent recourse for us.  At least for the sweaters, the Mira Dry treatment is showing good success and they are working on a treatment plan for hands and feet.  For us blushers though, there is nothing new in the pipeline.  What can we do though?  I don't see this changing anytime soon, because although ETS is no a desirable approach, it is apparently "good enough" to warrant no further research options.  Every study I see claims satisfaction rates in the 80-95% range.  I believe the lowest I've seen was a long term study that was around 60%.

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Thank you for that, Scarface. 
Regarding long term results from ETS, it is my understanding that very few studies have been done on the matter (Almost always the clinic sends out a questionnaire like 3-6 months after). One of the few I found, I see now, actually only showed a 42% satisfaction rate from blushers: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22191130

I agree that some surgeons, who do this for a living, probably will just keep doing it and say it is "good enough". But medicine in general is seeing a lot of progress. Combining that with spreading awareness of the severity of the problem, we might have new solutions in the not so distant future. Like Sweden (Performed over 3000 surgeries, so they must have understood that this is a serious problem, but they have now banned the surgery because of the side effects). Since they don't do the surgery anymore, but still know the problem is not gone, they should be working on better solutions (?). 

 

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Thank you for that, Scarface. 
Regarding long term results from ETS, it is my understanding that very few studies have been done on the matter (Almost always the clinic sends out a questionnaire like 3-6 months after). One of the few I found, I see now, actually only showed a 42% satisfaction rate from blushers: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22191130

I agree that some surgeons, who do this for a living, probably will just keep doing it and say it is "good enough". But medicine in general is seeing a lot of progress. Combining that with spreading awareness of the severity of the problem, we might have new solutions in the not so distant future. Like Sweden (Performed over 3000 surgeries, so they must have understood that this is a serious problem, but they have now banned the surgery because of the side effects). Since they don't do the surgery anymore, but still know the problem is not gone, they should be working on better solutions (?). 

 

Good find.  I hadn't seen that study before.  It very disenchanting.  Not even half of FB patients are satisfied long-term.  Wow.    

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I wonder what separated the 42% from the rest.  Perhaps they were in better physical shape, lived in drier climates, lived a sedentary lifestyle, better diet, etc.  Perhaps it is purely genetic luck as to how people respond to getting their sympathetic chain cut, but if I had to bet I would say there are steps you can take to increase your chances of a good outcome.   

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