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Blue Note

Remeron (Mirtazapine) for flushing

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I posted about Mirtazapine a few times on the old forum and thought I'd pass the info along again. I've been using it for over a year with great success.

It's an antidepressant that's also a strong antihistamine. It helps me sleep at night, which used to be a big problem. But most importantly, it significantly cuts down on my flushing. I'd say about 60-70 percent. Granted, I can still flush as bad as ever, but it's not as common (used to be every day) and it doesn't last as long as it used to. Also, since it helps me sleep, I'm less stressed and therefore less prone to flush.

Any flushers out there should definitely look into this med. Hope this helps someone!

Oh yeah, I take 7.5 mg in the morning and late afternoon, and 30 mg before I sleep. Usually knocks me out within an hour.

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Yeah, I should have mentioned that. The first few days I felt really sluggish, but adjusted rather quickly. I did get a serious appetite for the first few months, and really had to consciously control it. I put on a few pounds (went from 165 to 180) but then made an effort to not eat so much. Now it's not a problem.

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I wanna give this drug a try but i have a question. when i have a flush i flush on my nose and cheeks. I have tried effexor and this helped for my flushing on the cheeks on my nose it got worse so i stopped using it. Does remeron stop your flushing on the entire face? Because i don't wanna look like rudolph again!!!!

Thank you.....

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Thanks for the update Blue Note.

Remeron has several interesting pharmacological properties for an antidepressant. Its good to hear a few success stories.

Generally, the strong antihistamine action goes hand-in-hand with increased appetite, but with time, a person's appetite should re-establish itself. The sedation should also become more tolerable with time, as well. ....but I'm just restating what was already said.

Again, thanks for the update.

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I've seen quite a bit of Remeron for the treatment of depression in individuals with weight loss, like the elderly. It is a preferred antidepressant for individuals that WANT to gain wait. I stopped taking it after a 15 pound gain. And I monitor my weight very carefully.

I can tell you that most of the differences of the effects on antidepressants on different individuals depend greatly on the biological difference in the actual patient.

In other words, if Effexor made your nose turn red, Remeron may likely do so. When comparing among different antidepressants, some of the published side effects are class related and may occur across the board among ALL antidepressants of that kind. Let's say you take antidepressant "Pill A" and your friend takes "Pill B". Well, your friend's Antidepressant "Pill -B" may work better for her but it doesn't mean that it will work better for you. Your antidepressant "A" may work just as well on her as antidepressant "B" she is taking.

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The antidepressant properties should be considered carefully, but I'm touting this drug mainly for its antihistamine effect on flushing. The antidepressant part is just an added bonus.

Why not consider a plain antihistamine then? Unnecessary antidepressants could mess with your brain neurotransmitters a little much, in my humble opinion. Older generation antidepressants (pre-Prozac period drugs) like Elavil (amitriptyline) for instance have a MUCH higher antihistamine, anticholinergic effect. (So much that it was a negative for some patients) In fact, some unlabeled uses for Elavil include treatment of "unknown etiology rash". Maybe drugs like that would be a better option? Again, haven't done my research on that and I'm not sure if there are any studies out there.... Just my 2 cents...

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Hey, I was just wondering if these tablets can be broken apart. I have found them sold at 15mg, 30mg, and 45mg. Can they be broken down into smaller pieces easily? I ask because on the website that sells these they are all the same price for the same amount of pills. I was just curious if a 45mg pill could be broken into 4 pieces? Thanks for any input. Also, how long did it take till you noticed a difference in flushing?

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Yeah, they can be split. I split a 15 mg and take half in the morning, half in the early evening. Then I take a 30 mg before I go to bed.

I noticed a decrease in flushing the same day. Keep in mind, you WILL be drowsy when you first take it. It took me about three days to stop being so tired. It might affect you differently, of course.

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Is there any difference in the brand drug remeron and mirtazapine, or is the histamin level just as high in mirtazapine as in remeron....

I'm now on prozac for 10 days and I must say that the flushing is decreased a little bit but I have this itch all over my body. I'm thinking of switching to remeron..

Thanks...

Marco

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Hi Marco,

I'm not sure I understand your question correctly? Remeron is the U.S. brand name for the drug: mirtazapine released by the drug company Organon. There are no companies in the U.S. that produce generic mirtazapine yet. But if they did, they would have to be identical (for all therapeutic purposes) to the mirtazipine of brand name Remeron in order to receive FDA approval. Then these generics would be called mirtazapine but they could not be labeled legally as Remeron. Think of the brand name of a drug as it's marketing "stage name". Mirtazapine is marketed as Avanza® in Australia, Zispin® in the United Kingdom, Norset® in France and Remergil® in Germany. But they are all the same drug: mirtazapine. Hope this helps?

Oh, and generics are only allowed to be produced after the drug company that has initially launched the product has enjoyed a period of 7-14 years of non-competition... When their patent exclusivity starts to run out, usually companies start getting "creative" and slightly altering the original molecule to make it last longer or absorbed better or something flashy like: "solutabs". It's so they can enjoy that 7-14 year window again... I know that this is bad, but money TALKS!! I'm personally a proponent of using generic versions of any med when available. They are less expensive and just as effective. But the general public and some prescribers fall into the "brand-only" mentality which is naturally, promoted by the drug companies... But, hey it's YOUR money. :roll:

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Hi,

I want to share my experience with remeron so far. Till two months ago I couldn't stop flushing, burning etc. For almost a whole year! Literally non-stop almost and it drove me desperate. I had an IPL treatment in the beginning of 2005 that didn't went ok and triggered this extreme state: it made me extremely sensitive and flushed. Lately I've added propranolol and mirtazpine (remeron) to my regime (already using moxonidine, 0,2 mg three times a day) and it's making such a difference! I used propranolol before, with much less improvement, so I feel that most of this is due to the mirtazipine. A very knowledgeable dermatologist from London had prescribed it to me, especially for my extreme flushings. It cuts down my flushing episodes, the intensity of them and my general redness. I want to recommend it highly.

Side-effects: indeed: increased appetite and therefore some weight gain. I had a few weeks sort of a rash and itching on my face, but that has stopped lately luckily. It helps you sleep fast during the night, but gives me some vivid dreams, but that's not unpleasant.

Natalja

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Oh, and before I forget: Vickygirl mentioned amitriptyline somewhere I believe:I used amitriptyline as well for a while, especially for neuropathic burning, but it made me flush more. Discussed it after a while with my pharmacist and there seems to be a reason for it, according to him: It can open up the superficial facial bloodvessels and therefore stimulate the flushing.

Also: I tried virtually every antihistamine drug available and got a (n even more) red skin from all of them. But I'm extremely sensitive, skinwise... Luckily so far the mirtazipine seems to work and works it's antihistaminic actions on me as well.

Natalja

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Hey does this drug do the same sort of thing for blushing because i am more of a blusher and have been on seroxat for my problem? The seroxat has been working well but some of the side effects im not keen on like tiredness and lack of sex drive etc and was thinking of switching.

Seroxat takes a few weeks to really work does remeron or is it quite instantaneous?? I am suffering with depression as well at the moment and the seroxat does make me quite angry sometimes and im a very calm person does remeron do the same?? So many questions...but i am keen on switching. Also does it have to be taken in 3 goes dailly or can it just be taken in the morning.

If anyone can answer my questions will be vey grateful.

Cheers

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